American Society of Agronomy

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) is a scientific and professional society of agronomists and scientists of related disciplines, principally in the United States but with a large number of non-U.S. members as well. It was founded in 1907 with the objective of 'the increase and dissemination of knowledge concerning soils, crops, and the conditions affecting them.' One of its founding members was Charles Piper, who would become its president in 1914. The first president was Mark A. Carlton and the first annual meeting was held in Washington, D.C., in 1908. Two daughter societies were subsequently formed, the Soil Science Society of America and the Crop Science Society of America. The ASA is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, and publishes a number of scientific journals. The ASA holds annual meetings attended by thousands of its members.

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Oil spill impacts in coastal wetland

Although evidence of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill may not be visually obvious today, crude oil can still be found in Louisiana coastal marshes. Oil not initially degraded has become buried under the yearly pile of ...

dateJul 10, 2017 in Environment
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Calculating 'old' and 'new' water runoff

Just ahead of a rainstorm, Cody Ross might run out to an agricultural research site as part of his graduate work. He'll need to get some dye into an injection well. The point? To evaluate the path that water follows from ...

dateJun 28, 2017 in Environment
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Monitoring soil structure changes after compaction

Soil compaction is a global threat to soil ecosystem services, causing tremendous costs to society. The costs of soil compaction are borne by the cumulative loss of soil functionality (e.g. yield loss) following a compaction ...

dateJun 19, 2017 in Environment
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