American Society of Agronomy

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) is a scientific and professional society of agronomists and scientists of related disciplines, principally in the United States but with a large number of non-U.S. members as well. It was founded in 1907 with the objective of 'the increase and dissemination of knowledge concerning soils, crops, and the conditions affecting them.' One of its founding members was Charles Piper, who would become its president in 1914. The first president was Mark A. Carlton and the first annual meeting was held in Washington, D.C., in 1908. Two daughter societies were subsequently formed, the Soil Science Society of America and the Crop Science Society of America. The ASA is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, and publishes a number of scientific journals. The ASA holds annual meetings attended by thousands of its members.

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Carbon cycling in forest soils research presented

Just as individual humans have different microbial communities in their guts, the microbial communities living in soils vary from site to site as well. Recent research compared the decomposition rates of wood stakes over ...

dateSep 12, 2017 in Environment
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Spectroscopy: Simple solution for soil sample

Farmers and gardeners know their soil texture can make a big difference in their success. Different plants have different needs for water, nutrients, and air. When they grow in soil that has the right texture, it is easier ...

dateAug 30, 2017 in Environment
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Biochar shows benefits as manure lagoon cover

Manure is a reality in raising farm animals. Manure can be a useful fertilizer, returning valued nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium to the soil for plant growth. But manure has problems. Odor offensiveness, gas emissions, ...

dateAug 09, 2017 in Environment
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Adjusting fertilizers vital in claypan ag soils

All soils are not equal. Rich loams support the world's most productive agricultural regions, including swaths of the American Midwest. But in some parts of the Midwest, including areas in Missouri and Illinois, claypan soils ...

dateJul 26, 2017 in Environment
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