American Society of Agronomy

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) is a scientific and professional society of agronomists and scientists of related disciplines, principally in the United States but with a large number of non-U.S. members as well. It was founded in 1907 with the objective of 'the increase and dissemination of knowledge concerning soils, crops, and the conditions affecting them.' One of its founding members was Charles Piper, who would become its president in 1914. The first president was Mark A. Carlton and the first annual meeting was held in Washington, D.C., in 1908. Two daughter societies were subsequently formed, the Soil Science Society of America and the Crop Science Society of America. The ASA is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, and publishes a number of scientific journals. The ASA holds annual meetings attended by thousands of its members.

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Food or fuel? How about both?

In the United States, federal mandates to produce more renewable fuels, especially biofuels, have led to a growing debate: Should fuel or food grow on arable land? Recent research shows farmers can successfully, and sustainably, ...

dateMay 29, 2015 in Environment
shares21 comments 0

Just say 'No' to drugs—in water

Remember the science fair? For some of us it was an exciting time of creative experimentation. For others it was a time of botched and badly displayed data. For 16-year-old Maria Elena Grimmett, it's a blast. And she isn't ...

dateJul 30, 2015 in Environment
shares9 comments 0

Fortified against blindness

Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children. It also increases the risk of disease and death from severe infections, according to the World Health Organization. About 250 million preschool ...

dateAug 13, 2015 in Biotechnology
shares10 comments 0

Breeding a better peanut butter

Peanuts are big - big business that is. According to the National Peanut Board, Americans spend about $800 million a year on peanut butter, and peanuts contribute more than $4 billion a year to the US economy.

dateJul 30, 2015 in Other
shares13 comments 0

Covering the bases with cover crops

Most of us think that farmers grow and harvest crops for food. That's true for many crops: they either feed humans or farm animals. However, there's another category of crop that has a vital function in agricultural systems.

dateSep 30, 2015 in Environment
shares9 comments 0