American Society of Agronomy

The American Society of Agronomy (ASA) is a scientific and professional society of agronomists and scientists of related disciplines, principally in the United States but with a large number of non-U.S. members as well. It was founded in 1907 with the objective of 'the increase and dissemination of knowledge concerning soils, crops, and the conditions affecting them.' One of its founding members was Charles Piper, who would become its president in 1914. The first president was Mark A. Carlton and the first annual meeting was held in Washington, D.C., in 1908. Two daughter societies were subsequently formed, the Soil Science Society of America and the Crop Science Society of America. The ASA is headquartered in Madison, Wisconsin, and publishes a number of scientific journals. The ASA holds annual meetings attended by thousands of its members.

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Grain legume crops sustainable, nutritious

Popular diets across the world typically focus on the right balance of essential components like protein, fat, and carbohydrates. These items are called macronutrients, and we consume them in relatively large quantities. ...

dateJun 10, 2014 in Ecology
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Predicting bioavailable cadmium levels in soils

New Zealand's pastoral landscapes are some of the loveliest in the world, but they also contain a hidden threat. Many of the country's pasture soils have become enriched in cadmium. Grasses take up this toxic heavy metal, ...

dateApr 15, 2014 in Environment
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Antibiotic-eating bug unearthed in soil

It's well known how bacteria exposed to antibiotics for long periods will find ways to resist the drugs—by quickly pumping them out of their cells, for instance, or modifying the compounds so they're no longer toxic.

dateDec 07, 2012 in Earth Sciences
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