NASA selects essay competition winners

May 10, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has identified the winners of its high school essay competition to describe "Air Transportation in 2057."

The top prizes were awarded Sarah Vaden from Roanoke Valley Governor's School in Roanoke, Va., and Emma Peterson from Burnsview Secondary School in Delta, British Columbia.

NASA said 75 teenagers from across the United States and six foreign countries submitted 88 essays in four categories.

The top U.S. team was Tyler Pennington, Morgan Harless and Jared Hagan from Linwood Holton Governor's School in Abingdon, Va. The top international team was Nombuso Ndlovu, Shoki Kobe and Lerato Mthembu from the Lotus Hardens High School in Pretoria, South Africa.

The top scoring writers of U.S. essays will be presented with a trophy and a cash prize of $1,000, to be shared in the case of a team. Non-U.S. students will receive a trophy, but are not eligible for cash prizes.

Two teenagers tied for second place: Michael Donelson of Flagstaff High School, Flagstaff, Ariz., and Meghan Ferrall of Freedom High School in Tampa, Fla. Jacob Monat, a senior from Kee High School in Lansing, Iowa, was awarded the third place individual award.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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