Intel Preparing Q3 Launch for 'Caneland'

May 05, 2007

The launch of Intel's multiprocessor platform for servers will complete the company's transition to its Core microarchitecture, first introduced in 2006.

Intel is steadily moving toward converting the last of its products to its Core microarchitecture.

Following Intel's meeting with financial analysts on May 3, Thomas Kilroy, the vice president and general manager of Intel's Digital Enterprise Group, told eWEEK that the company is on schedule to release its "Caneland" platform for MP servers in the third quarter.

This MP or multiprocessor system offering will include a new quad-core processor that Intel has been calling "Tigerton," which will be sold under the Xeon 7300 series name.

The new processor will offer a TDP - an Intel term that refers to how much heat a chip has to dissipate - of 80 watts for standard rack systems and 50 watts for ultradense and blade servers. So far, Intel has not revealed other details of the processor, including configurations such as clock speed.

"With Intel bringing Core architecture to the MP space, we are providing our customers with a much more energy-efficient platform," Kilroy said.

Along with the Caneland platform, the Santa Clara, Calif., company will launch a new 7300 chip set, called "Clarksboro," which will support some of Intel's newer technologies, including four dedicated high-speed interconnects, a 64MB snoop-filter for improving system traffic, and full-buffered DIMM (dual in-line memory module) technology with DDR2-533 (double data rate 2) and DDR2-667, which will increase memory capacity.

The chip set will also include Intel's I/O Acceleration Technology 2, which provides for faster data flow between server applications and the network.

The new platform and chip set are geared for four-way systems but will also have the ability to scale up to systems with even more sockets. Hewlett-Packard has already expressed interest in the platform.

The final conversion of Intel's products to its Core architecture, which it first unveiled in 2006, comes as the company is preparing for its next major endeavor: moving its manufacturing from 65-nanometer to 45-nanometer.

The first of Intel's "Penryn" family of 45-nanometer processors is expected to hit the market later this year, with dual- and quad-core products aimed at notebooks, desktops and servers.

Intel will not launch a new microarchitecture until 2008 with "Nehalem." That will be followed by a shrink to 32-nanometer technology in 2009.

At the May 4 meeting, Intel CEO Paul Otellini mainly talked about the company's cost-cutting efforts, which started in 2006. Those cuts are expected to save the company about $5 billion during the next two years.

The meeting also placed a heavy emphasis on mobility, including laptops, ultraportable PCs and mobile internet devices, as well as low-cost PCs geared toward emerging markets.

On May 9, Intel will launch its fourth-generation Centrino mobile platform, "Santa Rosa," for both consumer and enterprise laptops.

"CPUs are becoming a bigger piece of the business and the company is making a push to compete in every possible area a microprocessor can be used," Doug Freedman, an analyst with American Technology Research, wrote after the meeting.

"With a - two - -year cycle potentially accelerating and 32nm slides already prepared for the event, we believe Intel has set the stage for a multiyear period of - outperforming - its competition," Freedman added.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Toshiba to launch world's fastest microSD memory cards

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Intel makes new moves on Edison: Atom yes, Quark no

Apr 02, 2014

(Phys.org) —Last month's Intel blog post by an Intel VP, Michael Bell, announced the latest enhancements for Edison, the company's platform with built-in wireless, targeted for builders of small form factor ...

Big, fast, weird data

Apr 08, 2014

The "Big Data" research that continues to dominate IT agendas has traditionally focused on making sense of the growing volumes of computer data. Yet in recent years, the volume question has given way to the other V's of Big ...

Intel bets big on cloud, with stake in Cloudera

Mar 31, 2014

In a sign of the growing importance of the Internet "cloud," software group Cloudera said Monday it raised a whopping $900 million to expand its big data corporate services.

ARM chip makers set to reach 3GHz next year

Jul 10, 2013

(Phys.org) —ARM chip makers TSMC and GlobalFoundries have revealed that they plan to release ARM processor chips capable of running at 3GHz sometime next year. Such chips will almost certainly be welcomed ...

Intel's Perceptual Computing marks neo-desktop era

Jan 14, 2013

(Phys.org)—Intel wants you to know that voice, face and gesture control will become a familiar feature in computers. The time for a new kind of notebook world is now, for Intel, and computing facets including ...

Recommended for you

FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards

14 minutes ago

The Federal Communications Commission is set to propose new open Internet rules that would allow content companies to pay for faster delivery over the so-called "last mile" connection to people's homes.

SK Hynix posts Q1 surge in net profit

14 minutes ago

South Korea's SK Hynix Inc said Thursday its first-quarter net profit surged nearly 350 percent from the previous year on a spike in sales of PC memory chips.

Brazil enacts Internet 'Bill of Rights'

34 minutes ago

Brazil's president signed into law on Wednesday a "Bill of Rights" for the digital age that aims to protect online privacy and promote the Internet as a public utility by barring telecommunications companies ...

Zynga founder Pincus leaving operations role

11 hours ago

Online game maker Zynga says company founder Mark Pincus is stepping down as chief product officer, less than a year after he was replaced as the company's CEO.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Brazil enacts Internet 'Bill of Rights'

Brazil's president signed into law on Wednesday a "Bill of Rights" for the digital age that aims to protect online privacy and promote the Internet as a public utility by barring telecommunications companies ...

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...

US urged to drop India WTO case on solar

Environmentalists Wednesday urged the United States to drop plans to haul India to the WTO to open its solar market, saying the action would hurt the fight against climate change.

FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

The federal government wants to prohibit sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels under regulations being proposed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Vermont moves toward labeling of GMO foods

Vermont lawmakers have passed the country's first state bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods as such, setting up a war between the behemoth U.S. food industry and an American public that overwhelmingly ...