'Supportal' Provides Tech Support for Living Room

May 03, 2007

Manufacturers support their own products. But what to do when you're trying to make them work with something else? A new support site, Supportal.com, promises help for both the home and office.

Basically, it's designed to get Dad off the hook at home, and help the SOHO IT professional on the job. "It's aimed at ending the digital finger-pointing around the digital lifestyle," said Ronald Renjilian, president and chief executive of Peak8 Solutions, in an interview.

The company will support "any device or software - customers - use in their digital lifestyle 24 hours a day, 7 days a week."

The site offers a community where consumers can trade tips on setting up a wired living room, and also offers technical support through what the company promises will be a "level 2" support technician, who can attempt to solve problems without reading through a script. Initially, however, customers will be asked to search for their own solution through a downloadable client application.

The site will charge $30 per incident, or $10 a month for a subscription, Renjilian said. In a statement, the company said it would offer a money-back satisfaction guarantee.

The new site was announced at the Parks Associates' Connections 2007 show here.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

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