iriver Intros Next-Gen Clix Audio Player

Apr 26, 2007
iriver Intros Next-Gen Clix Audio Player

On Wednesday iriver followed up its interestingly designed clix MP3 player with its second-generation audio device, with a novel LCD screen for extended battery life.

On Wednesday, iriver followed up its interestingly designed clix MP3 player with a new device. Termed the "second generation iriver clix," this latest portable digital audio product is also a small flash-memory based personal music player, just like its predecessor, and sports the same 4-way rocking screen for use as a main interface.

Available in storage flavors of 2 Gbytes, 4 GB, and 8 GB – priced at $149.99, 199.99, and $249.99 respectively – the new clix boasts a sizeable 2.2-inch QVGA AMOLED (Active Matrix Organically Light Emitting Diode) screen. This display is designed to be more energy efficient than the ubiquitous LCDs found on competing players. As a result, iriver claims the clix to have a rated battery life of a lengthy 24 hours for music playback and 5 hours screening video.

The lightweight 1.9-ounce clix also supports a wide variety of file formats including MP3, WMA and OGG Q10 for music along with the Microsoft PlaysForSure DRM protocol, ensuring its compatibility with major music subscription providers such as Rhapsody, Napster, EMusic and URGE. In addition it'll play audible audiobooks plus MPEG4 videos and JPEG pictures. There's even a game feature for playing the included flash titles.

According to iriver, you can also switch the clix between a MTP mode for easy synching with Windows Vista and XP (Service pack 1 or later) PCs and a UMS mode to drag and drop files over from older windows machines. Expect to find the device on sale now at iriver's online store.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: A smart wristband for nocturnal cyclists

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fighting bacteria—with viruses

31 minutes ago

Research published today in PLOS Pathogens reveals how viruses called bacteriophages destroy the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. diff), which is becoming a serious problem in hospitals and healthcare institutes, due to its re ...

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently

1 hour ago

Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behaviour.

Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed

1 hour ago

Actin is the most abundant protein in the body, and when you look more closely at its fundamental role in life, it's easy to see why. It is the basis of most movement in the body, and all cells and components ...

Recommended for you

A smart wristband for nocturnal cyclists

10 hours ago

Five EPFL PhD students have developed a wristband that flashes when the rider reaches out to indicate a turn. Their invention was recognized at a European competition.

Lenovo's smart glasses prototype has battery at neck

Jul 28, 2014

China's PC giant Lenovo last week offered a peek at its Google Glass-competing smart glass prototype, further details of which are to be announced in October. Lenovo's glasses prototype is not an extreme ...

Sapphire talk enlivens guesswork over iPhone 6

Jul 27, 2014

Sapphire screens for the next iPhone? Sapphire is second only to diamond in hardness scratch-proof properties, used in making LEDs, missiles sensors, and on screens for luxury-tier phones. Last year, the ...

Startup offers elderly an Internet key to family links

Jul 27, 2014

Two grandmothers mystified by computer tablets have inspired a French-Romanian startup to develop an application and service to help the elderly stay in touch with their relatives through the Internet.

User comments : 0