Cisco to Ship 3G Support for Integrated Services Router

Apr 13, 2007

The router with its new wireless card is designed to be used by remote businesses and emergency workers or in areas where traditional high-speed wired connections aren't available.

Cisco Systems in the summer of 2007 will begin shipping new third-generation wireless cards that add an additional connectivity option to its Integrated Services Router. The new cards, which can be purchased in either CDMA or GSM versions, are designed to work either as a backup to an existing land-line WAN or as the primary network connection in areas where land-line connections might not be available.

According to the company, the Integrated Services Router is designed to fail over to the 3G card in the event that the primary connection becomes unavailable. However, a company spokesperson said it's also designed to be used by remote businesses and emergency workers or in areas where traditional high-speed wired connections aren't available.

Each of the cards is designed to work with the fastest version of its respective protocol choices, and to fall back to other choices when necessary.

For example, the GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) card will work with HSDPA (High-Speed Downlink Packet Access) first, then fall back to EDGE (Enhanced Data for Global Evolution). Likewise, the CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) card will first attempt to communicate with EvDO (Evolution Data Optimized) Rev. A, then fall back to Rev. 0.

The new cards will work with Cisco's management software and fit seamlessly into a Cisco networking environment.

Cisco's spokesperson said these cards are not voice-enabled, but he said they will support all of the features needed for voice, including QOS (quality of service), and he added that nothing in the design of the cards prevents the use of voice, for example as a part of a company VOIP (voice over IP) solution. In addition, the cards will not communicate directly with wireless devices, but rather are intended to communicate as clients with the 3G wireless network.

The new cards will work in conjunction with Cisco's WLAN (wireless LAN) controllers. Currently AT&T/Cingular, Sprint Nextel and Verizon Wireless have announced support for the cards in the United States. The cards will cost $4,750 in quantities of eight, or $6,500 in quantities of 12.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Cruising high seas, engineers detect fake GPS signals

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

PlayStation TV to soon hit US-Europe

Jun 10, 2014

Sony Computer Entertainment said a PlayStation TV home entertainment system will debut in North America and Europe by the end of this year.

Recommended for you

Chinese smartphone makers win as market swells

53 minutes ago

Chinese smartphone makers racked up big gains as the global market for Internet-linked handsets grew to record levels in the second quarter, International Data Corp said Tuesday.

Full appeals court upholds labels on meat packages

53 minutes ago

(AP)—A federal appeals court has upheld new government rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered.

Connected devices have huge security holes: study

1 hour ago

The surge Web-connected devices—TVs, refrigerators, thermostats, door locks and more—has opened up huge opportunities for cyberattacks because of weak security, researchers said Thursday.

BlackBerry to buy Germany's Secusmart

1 hour ago

(AP)—German voice and data encryption specialist Secusmart, which helps equip the German government with secure smartphones, says it's being acquired by BlackBerry for an undisclosed sum.

India's Flipkart raises $1 bn to tackle Amazon

3 hours ago

India's top e-commerce company Flipkart said Tuesday it had raised $1 billion (60 billion rupees) in funds as it battles US giant Amazon for supremacy in the hyper-competitive local market.

User comments : 0