New wireless technology to be developed

Apr 04, 2007

A U.S. research team has been awarded a $3.5 million government grant to develop a new portable wireless communications technology.

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers will use tiny, power-saving analog chips to develop portable communications technology capable of scanning a broad range of radio-frequency bands for open channels.

The principal investigator, Farrokh Ayazi, co-director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center, said the analog spectral processors will be designed for such uses as aiding battlefield communication and enabling cellular phones to find less-crowded frequencies.

"The project's goal is basically to create a small, low-power handheld device that combines a spectrum analyzer and a truly powerful communication device," said Ayazi, a Georgia Tech associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. "We are basically looking for orders-of-magnitude improvement in performance, size and cost.

"The ultimate goal," he added, "is to integrate ASP's with high-speed electronics on a single chip and bring unprecedented capabilities to the wireless world."

Other U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-funded teams -- including scientists from Stanford and Cornell universities, and the universities of San Diego, California-Berkeley and Pennsylvania -- are working on similar projects.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Review: 2015 Chevy Colorado pickup comes with a side of Wi-Fi

Related Stories

Team works to counter a new class of coffee shop hackers

Jan 08, 2015

If you're sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn't connect to the shop's wifi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you're doing just ...

Recommended for you

DARPA seeks new positioning, navigation, timing solutions

Mar 28, 2015

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), writing about GPS, said: "The military relies heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS) for positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), but GPS access is easily blocked by methods such as jamming. In addition, many environments in which our mil ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.