New wireless technology to be developed

Apr 04, 2007

A U.S. research team has been awarded a $3.5 million government grant to develop a new portable wireless communications technology.

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers will use tiny, power-saving analog chips to develop portable communications technology capable of scanning a broad range of radio-frequency bands for open channels.

The principal investigator, Farrokh Ayazi, co-director of the Georgia Electronic Design Center, said the analog spectral processors will be designed for such uses as aiding battlefield communication and enabling cellular phones to find less-crowded frequencies.

"The project's goal is basically to create a small, low-power handheld device that combines a spectrum analyzer and a truly powerful communication device," said Ayazi, a Georgia Tech associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. "We are basically looking for orders-of-magnitude improvement in performance, size and cost.

"The ultimate goal," he added, "is to integrate ASP's with high-speed electronics on a single chip and bring unprecedented capabilities to the wireless world."

Other U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency-funded teams -- including scientists from Stanford and Cornell universities, and the universities of San Diego, California-Berkeley and Pennsylvania -- are working on similar projects.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: FCC chief proposes opening the pay-TV industry to tech firms

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Silicon-germanium chip sets new speed record

Feb 19, 2014

(Phys.org) —A research collaboration consisting of IHP-Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics in Germany and the Georgia Institute of Technology has demonstrated the world's fastest silicon-based ...

Recommended for you

Wi-Fi hotspot named for terror group delays flight

Oct 27, 2014

A passenger aboard a plane at Los Angeles International Airport picked up a Wi-Fi hotspot named after a terrorist group, but authorities who held travelers for hours as they investigated say no crime was committed.

'Eye in the sky' will bypass Internet traffic jams

Oct 27, 2014

When you're driving to work you wish you knew where the traffic jams will be. The same is true on the Internet, but network operators today can't observe or control the paths that carry data beyond the borders of their own ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.