Scientists shed new light on cold fusion

Mar 30, 2007

U.S. scientists say the concept of cold fusion, a controversial concept once hailed as a scientific breakthrough, may be ready for rebirth.

Researchers at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Chicago this week said the phenomenon now known as low energy nuclear reaction, is supportable by "rigorous, repeatable experimental data," the ACS said in a release.

Nearly a dozen scientists presented their findings at Thursday's meeting.

When the concept of cold fusion was introduced in 1989 it was hailed as a "scientific breakthrough with the potential to solve the world's energy problems by providing a virtually unlimited energy source," the ACS said.

Subsequent experiments, however, largely failed to replicate the initial findings.

One of the original scientists behind the concept reported new evidence Thursday that the excess heat generated by cold fusion is nuclear and not the result of calorimetric errors.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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oldgeek64
not rated yet Apr 17, 2009
seems like cold fusion is heating up again!

In a landmark broadcast airing Sunday, April 19, 2009 at 7pm EST, CBS News Magazine,

'60 Minutes', profiles the breakthrough research accomplished by Energetics Technologies LLC in the field of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR), historically referred to as %u2018Cold Fusion%u2019.



http://www.energe...gies.com

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