Manhattan Project scientist dies

Mar 02, 2007

Rose A. Carney, who as a Chicago graduate student worked on the Manhattan Project, which led to the creation of the atomic bomb, has died at the age of 86.

"She was at the University of Chicago as a research assistant in the instruments division," her friend Ralph Meeker told the Chicago Sun-Times. "She was part of the team responsible for the instrumentation used to make measurements of sustained nuclear reactions."

"When I talked with her about it she downplayed what she did and her small contributions to ... a fairly substantial project," he said.

Carney died last week at Villa St. Benedict in Lisle, the Sun-Times reported.

She was the former head of the math department and natural sciences division at St. Procopius College, now Benedictine University. When she retired, students and faculty set up scholarships in her honor, the newspaper said.

The Sun-Times said Carney was devoted to encouraging young women to enter the fields of math and science.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Best of Last Week – First map of hidden universe, pursuit of compact fusion and new clues about the causes of depression

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

MasterCard, Zwipe announce fingerprint-sensor card

11 hours ago

On Friday, MasterCard and Oslo, Norway-based Zwipe announced the launch of a contactless payment card featuring an integrated fingerprint sensor. Say goodbye to PINs. This card, they said, is the world's ...

Plastic nanoparticles also harm freshwater organisms

13 hours ago

Organisms can be negatively affected by plastic nanoparticles, not just in the seas and oceans but in freshwater bodies too. These particles slow the growth of algae, cause deformities in water fleas and impede communication ...

Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms

13 hours ago

Throw a rock through a window made of silica glass, and the brittle, insulating oxide pane shatters. But whack a golf ball with a club made of metallic glass—a resilient conductor that looks like metal—and the glass not ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

21 hours ago

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

Recommended for you

Secrets of dinosaur ecology found in fragile amber

13 hours ago

Ryan McKellar's research sounds like it was plucked from Jurassic Park: he studies pieces of amber found buried with dinosaur skeletons. But rather than re-creating dinosaurs, McKellar uses the tiny pieces ...

User comments : 0