Manhattan Project scientist dies

Mar 02, 2007

Rose A. Carney, who as a Chicago graduate student worked on the Manhattan Project, which led to the creation of the atomic bomb, has died at the age of 86.

"She was at the University of Chicago as a research assistant in the instruments division," her friend Ralph Meeker told the Chicago Sun-Times. "She was part of the team responsible for the instrumentation used to make measurements of sustained nuclear reactions."

"When I talked with her about it she downplayed what she did and her small contributions to ... a fairly substantial project," he said.

Carney died last week at Villa St. Benedict in Lisle, the Sun-Times reported.

She was the former head of the math department and natural sciences division at St. Procopius College, now Benedictine University. When she retired, students and faculty set up scholarships in her honor, the newspaper said.

The Sun-Times said Carney was devoted to encouraging young women to enter the fields of math and science.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Dubai to curate next hot thing in 'Museum of the Future'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fashionable or geeky—the modern watch dilemma

28 minutes ago

It's Milan fashion week, you've got tickets to the catwalk shows and an outfit to die for, but which watch to wear? A chunky smartwatch or chic ticker that can't tell the time?

Small SUVs, pricey sports cars dominate at Geneva auto show

47 minutes ago

(AP)—Small SUVs for families and powerful sports cars for the rich are the big things this year at the Geneva International Motor Show this year. Environmentally correct electrics and hybrids, not so much—thanks ...

Recommended for you

Bribery 'hits 1.6 billion people a year'

Feb 27, 2015

A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide – nearly a quarter of the global population – are forced to pay bribes to gain access to everyday public services, according to a new book by academics at the Universities of Birmingham ...

How music listening programmes can be easily fooled

Feb 26, 2015

For well over two decades, researchers have sought to build music listening software that can address the deluge of music growing faster than our Spotify-spoilt appetites. From software that can tell you ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.