AIAA recommends actions for implementation of lunar settlements

Feb 13, 2007

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Space Colonization Technical Committee (SCTC) has developed a position statement which recommends specific research, development, technology and engineering goals be implemented in order to establish a Moon base by 2015 and open new frontiers to human space exploration.

The AIAA/SCTC paper emphasizes human settlement of the Moon; development of lunar observatories, energy and resources uses; and sustained, active encouragement of private and international enterprise. It recommends the establishment of the scientific and industrial capabilities of a permanent lunar settlement and development of the commercial revenue sources on the Moon.

Recommendations in the paper cover the early period (present – 2015), mid-period (2015-2025) and far period (2025-2050). The SCTC also calls for the United States to work with international partners to pursue free-market rules to the development of space; international conventions on property and mineral rights; and land management conventions to include provisions for homesteading.

The AIAA/SCTC supports a strengthened space program through robust implementation of lunar settlements with commercial and international enterprises.

Source: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

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