AMO Manufactures First Graphene Transistors

Feb 08, 2007
AMO Manufactures First Graphene Transistors

In the scope of his innovative project ALEGRA the AMO nanoelectronics group of Dr. Max Lemme was able to manufacture top-gated transistor-like field-effect devices from monolayer graphene.

Compared to conventional silicon and SOI MOSFETs the researchers realized a significant enhancement of electron and hole mobility.

Moore’s law, which has dictated ambitious innovation cycles to the semiconductor industry over the last decades, may finally be running out of steam. In the future, innovations for silicon technology may only be realized by integrating new functionalities or novel materials.

Carbon is one of the most probable candidates: impressive potential for nanoelectronics applications has been demonstrated with carbon nanotubes – and graphene!

A conventional CMOS-compatible process has been applied to fabricate a graphene field-effect device – a transistor made from a monolayer of carbon. The observed mobility in the devices exceeds the universal mobility in silicon MOSFETs. Furthermore, a second transistor gate was placed on top of the graphene film for the first time. AMO’s results confirm the high potential of graphene for future nanoelectronic devices.

First experimental details will be published in IEEE Electron Device Letters in April 2007.

Citation: M.C. Lemme, T.J. Echtermeyer, M. Baus, H. Kurz, “A Graphene Field Effect Device”, IEEE Electron Device Letters, Vol. 28, No. 4, April 2007.

Source: AMO

Explore further: Scaling up armor systems

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect

Jan 30, 2015

A complex interplay of molecular components governs almost all aspects of biological sciences - healthy organism development, disease progression, and drug efficacy are all dependent on the way life's molecules ...

Holes in valence bands of nanodiamonds discovered

Jan 28, 2015

Nanodiamonds are tiny crystals only a few nanometers in size. While they possess the crystalline structure of diamonds, their properties diverge considerably from those of their big brothers, because their ...

Demystifying nanocrystal solar cells

Jan 28, 2015

ETH researchers have developed a comprehensive model to explain how electrons flow inside new types of solar cells made of tiny crystals. The model allows for a better understanding of such cells and may ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.