Study: U.S. commuting trends are changing

Jan 25, 2007

A new report suggests U.S. commuting trends are rapidly changing, mainly due to increasing immigration and more people reaching retirement age.

The report -- Commuting in America III -- is the latest decadal review of the nation's commuting patterns from the Transportation Research Board. Author Alan Pisarski notes although the personal vehicle remains the most common way to go to work, public transit and carpooling are becoming increasingly popular.

"One of the most significant changes will probably come from newly arrived immigrants," said Pisarski. "Unlike most native-born Americans or immigrants who have been in the United States for more than five years, many new immigrants either carpool, bike, walk, or use public transportation for their daily commute."

Other findings in the report include:

-- The number of workers with commutes lasting more than 60 minutes grew by nearly 50 percent between 1990 and 2000.

-- Men comprise the majority of early-morning commuters from midnight to 7:30 a.m.; women make up the majority of commuters after approximately 7:30 a.m.

-- Only about 4 percent of workers live in households with no vehicle.

The study is available online at
www.TRB.org

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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