Space officials talk about the ISS

Jan 23, 2007

The heads of the International Space Station partners met at the European Space Agency headquarters in Paris Tuesday to review ISS cooperation.

The chiefs of space agencies from Canada, Europe, Japan, Russia and the United States noted the significant accomplishments of their partnership in implementing the space station configuration and assembly sequence endorsed during their last meeting in March 2006.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration says among the milestones noted were re-establishment of the three-person ISS crew and re-initiation of station assembly activities and space shuttle missions with extravehicular accomplishments by American, Russian, Canadian and European astronauts.

The space chiefs, among other things, expressed continued appreciation for the work by in-orbit crews and ground support personnel to bring the space station to its full productive capacity.

NASA said the space agency heads acknowledged the strength of their partnership and the importance of international cooperation in achieving mutual objectives in the exploration and utilization of space.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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