New game teaches energy conservation

Dec 20, 2006

U.S. engineers have designed a board game that teaches middle school children how their energy choices directly impact energy conservation.

The game developed at Clarkston University asks questions such as "What's the most energy efficient way to cook dinner: a gas stove, electric stove or microwave?" "Should you buy a new refrigerator or use grandma's old one (that) costs less but uses more energy?" and "How should an unstable petroleum market affect car buying decisions?"

Clarkson engineers said they hope the game, called Energy Choices, will motivate the next generation of consumers to think about how energy choices are made, the role economics play in such decisions and how to identify trade-offs that are acceptable and those that are not.

"The game is challenging and fun," said Professor Susan Powers. "It helps students understand energy concepts and the complexity of the issues. It also reinforces for each student the important role he or she really does play as an environmental stakeholder in our world."

The game was developed as part of the university's award-winning K-12 Project-Based Learning Partnership Program.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Designing exascale computers

Jul 23, 2014

"Imagine a heart surgeon operating to repair a blocked coronary artery. Someday soon, the surgeon might run a detailed computer simulation of blood flowing through the patient's arteries, showing how millions ...

Recommended for you

Color and texture matter most when it comes to tomatoes

Oct 21, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), evaluated consumers' choice in fresh tomato selection and revealed which characteristics make the red fruit most appealing.

How the lotus got its own administration

Oct 21, 2014

Actually the lotus is a very ordinary plant. Nevertheless, during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) a complex bureaucratic structure was built up around this plant. The lotus was part of the Imperial Household, ...

What labels on textiles can tell us about society

Oct 21, 2014

Throughout Chinese history, dynastic states used labels on textiles to spread information on the maker, the commissioner, the owner or the date and site of production. Silks produced in state-owned manufacture ...

US company sells out of Ebola toys

Oct 17, 2014

They might look tasteless, but satisfied customers dub them cute and adorable. Ebola-themed toys have proved such a hit that one US-based company has sold out.

User comments : 0