Scientists see benefits of nanoceria

Nov 01, 2006

A U.S. study suggests cerium oxide -- used in polishing glass and in car exhaust systems -- might be used to treat various eye disorders and other diseases.

James McGinnis and colleagues at the University of Oklahoma injected cerium oxide nanoparticles into the eyes of rats and discovered the substance can protect the retina against exposure to damaging levels of illumination. If injected after exposure, the nanoparticles assisted recovery.

The researchers say the nanoparticles neutralize the effects of compounds known as reactive oxygen intermediates, or ROIs, although the mechanism underlying the process remains unclear.

The study's results indicate cerium oxide nanoparticles may be effective in inhibiting cell death caused by ROIs, which is thought to be involved in various medical conditions affecting the eye, such as macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa.

The researchers speculate the particles might be effective in treating a range of other degenerative diseases involving ROIs, such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and strokes.

Study results appear in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Synthetic virus developed to deliver a new generation of medicines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

10 minutes ago

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers' schedules—one reason ...

Top ten reptiles and amphibians benefitting from zoos

10 minutes ago

A frog that does not croak, the largest living lizard, and a tortoise that can live up to 100 years are just some of the species staving off extinction thanks to the help of zoos, according to a new report.

Changes in farming and climate hurting British moths

20 minutes ago

Britain's moths are feeling the pinch – threatened on one side by climate change and on the other by habitat loss and harmful farming methods. A new study gives the most comprehensive picture yet of trends ...

Recommended for you

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle

Aug 26, 2014

Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles ...

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

Aug 22, 2014

Anyone who has suffered an injury can probably remember the after-effects, including pain, swelling or redness. These are signs that the body is fighting back against the injury. When tissue in the body is damaged, biological ...

User comments : 0