Student's summer software success gets Big Blue buzzing

Nov 01, 2006

A computer program created by a University of Manchester student during his summer holidays is being developed further by industry giant IBM.

Robert Craig, a final year Computer Science student, played a key role in developing a piece of business software called ESP.

The policy management tool is designed to process so-called 'computer readable' data, taken from important policy documents agreed between a company and a client.

Robert and his team developed a Web application that allows this computer-readable information to be interpreted and presented in a 'human-readable' format.

Robert, who is 21 and originally from Macclesfield, was one of just sixteen students selected from universities across the UK to participate in IBM's 2006 Extreme Blue programme, which is designed to foster innovation.

Extreme Blue challenges groups of students to develop the technology and a business plan for a new product or service that addresses an existing market challenge.

There were four teams of undergraduates involved in the UK programme, consisting of both business and technical members. The teams were supported by IBM technical and business mentors.

The UK scheme was based at IBM Hursley Park near Winchester, but schemes also ran in Ireland, France, Germany and Holland. All of the teams then came together at a special expo at IBM in La Gaude, France.

The teams met each other and had the opportunity to present and demonstrate their projects to senior IBM executives and technical employees from around Europe.

IBM, which is also known as Big Blue, says that following the expo in France earlier this year, ESP is now being investigated and developed further.

"Extreme Blue was an amazing experience," said Robert. "The programme was only three months long, which meant everything was quite intense.

"It is unique, as you are involved in the whole software development process from requirement gathering, through to developing, through to testing.

"Over the summer I learnt a vast amount in many areas, not just technical skills. My public speaking skills have really developed due to the presentations we had to give at the expo in France and the conference calls with people from all over the globe.

"I find the fact that our work is going to be continued extremely exciting, as I know how much the final product will help a vast number of people."

Robert says that once his Web application has been integrated with some other tools, it should be able to scan the computer-readable data and check for policy compliance on all the computers within a customer's business.

When it finds instances of non-compliance, it will automatically flag this up to the relevant people.

Source: University of Manchester

Explore further: A new kind of data-driven predictive methodology

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mercedes-Benz 2025 truck shows autonomous system vision

7 hours ago

Coming down the road will be the future truck of 2025 and it will be able to move autonomously. The Mercedes-Benz Future Truck 2025 was recently showcased at this year's International Commercial Vehicle show ...

A mirror with a peephole

Aug 13, 2014

When light shines through air onto water, some of the light usually will be reflected back into the air. But at one specific angle, called the Brewster angle, all of the p-polarized light travels into the ...

Can Modi clean the Ganges, India's biggest sewage line?

Jul 17, 2014

Standing on the banks of the river Ganges a day after his election triumph, Prime Minister Narendra Modi vowed to succeed where numerous governments have failed: by cleaning up the filthy waterway beloved ...

DARPA's experimental space plane XS-1 starts development

Jul 16, 2014

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is looking to develop a fully-reusable unmanned spaceplane, and they are now ready to start working their proposed Experimental Spaceplane (XS-1). The ...

Recommended for you

Five ways the superintelligence revolution might happen

Sep 26, 2014

Biological brains are unlikely to be the final stage of intelligence. Machines already have superhuman strength, speed and stamina – and one day they will have superhuman intelligence. This is of course ...

User comments : 0