NASA announces aeronautics competition

Oct 10, 2006

NASA has announced a new aeronautics competition for U.S. high school and college students looking at the future of flight.

The competition, sponsored by the agency's Fundamental Aeronautics Program, is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's mission is to inspire the next generation of engineers, scientists and explorers.

High school students are challenged to put themselves 50 years into the future to describe how air transportation systems will have evolved with vehicles flying at various speeds. Entries are due by March 15.

College students are invited to propose solutions for complex technical problems in hypersonic and supersonic flight; subsonic fixed and rotary wing transports; or Mars entry, descent and landing. College entries are due by April 27.

NASA said monetary awards ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 may be available for first-place winners in each category. There will be awards for second and third places and honorable mention recognition.

Officials said winning university students might be offered a 10-week summer internship at a NASA field center.

NASA said all prizes will be determined based on the amount of available funds.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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