Web site helps students in math

Sep 06, 2006

A University of Missouri-Columbia Web site that helps students prepare for math tests and competitions is reportedly gaining popularity.

The site, developed by Mathematics Professor Elias Saab, is ranked as the No. 1 site on Google when searching for "online math tests," positioning it above approximately 53 million other similar sites, university officials said.

The Web site -- MathOnline (mathonline.missouri.edu) -- provides free tests students can use for practice or self-evaluation and that school officials can use to assess their students' readiness in mathematics, Saab said.

MathOnline provides interactive tests in high school geometry, algebra and trigonometry, as well as for placement in first-year calculus and college algebra. Options allow users to personalize tests by choosing the number of problems (from 5 to 75, in denominations of 5) and whether the questions are multiple choice or single-answer blanks.

After students finish the tests, the site provides the correct answers with a detailed explanation of each problem. The site also has a database of problems large enough that students can take similar tests several times without repeating questions.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How science can beat the flawed metric that rules it

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Using mosquitos to decrease the mosquito population

Jul 15, 2014

Who would have thought of mosquitoes being put to work to help decrease and control the mosquito population? University of Kentucky professor and researcher Stephen Dobson and his former graduate student, ...

Taking the temperature of deep geothermal reservoirs

Jul 08, 2014

(Phys.org) —A lot can happen to water as it rises to the surface from deep underground. It can mix with groundwater, for example. This makes it difficult for scientists to estimate the temperature of a ...

Advancing medicine, layer by layer

Jul 02, 2014

Personalized cancer treatments and better bone implants could grow from techniques demonstrated by graduate students Stephen W. Morton and Nisarg J. Shah, who are both working in chemical engineering professor ...

Recommended for you

How science can beat the flawed metric that rules it

38 minutes ago

In order to improve something, we need to be able to measure its quality. This is true in public policy, in commercial industries, and also in science. Like other fields, science has a growing need for quantitative ...

Decoding ethnic labels

1 hour ago

If you are of Latin American descent, do you call yourself Chicano? Latino? Hispanic?

Local education politics 'far from dead'

22 hours ago

Teach for America, known for recruiting teachers, is also setting its sights on capturing school board seats across the nation. Surprisingly, however, political candidates from the program aren't just pushing ...

First grade reading suffers in segregated schools

22 hours ago

A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools—but the ...

Violent aftermath for the warriors at Alken Enge

23 hours ago

Denmark attracted international attention in 2012 when archaeological excavations revealed the bones of an entire army, whose warriors had been thrown into the bogs near the Alken Enge wetlands in East Jutland ...

Why aren't consumers buying remanufactured products?

Jul 29, 2014

Firms looking to increase market share of remanufactured consumer products will have to overcome a big barrier to do so, according to a recent study from the Penn State Smeal College of Business. Findings from faculty members ...

User comments : 0