Science pay gap: gender discrimination?

Sep 05, 2006

A British study suggests discrimination plays a significant role in the pay gap between men and women scientists working in British universities.

Sara Connolly of the University of East Anglia's School of Economics says her study reveals for the first time what proportion of the pay disparity is due to women being younger, more junior or employed in different types of institution or subject areas.

Connolly says her preliminary results suggest a nearly 23 percent pay gap is "unexplained" and may be due to discrimination against women.

"This confirms what many working women scientists have long felt," said Connolly. "My research provides sound facts and figures, rather than anecdotal evidence and hearsay, which I hope will be used to develop and implement effective policies to tackle this problem."

The study was presented Tuesday during the Festival of Science being held in Norwich.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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