AOL releases broadband service beta

Sep 01, 2006

Dulles, Va., software company AOL has released a beta version of its OpenRide broadband client.

The release of the OpenRide client Wednesday followed an announcement by the company that it would offer services previously available only to paid subscribers for free to broadband users, TechWeb reported Thursday.

The client uses a quad-view design that features e-mail, instant messaging, an address book, a Web browser and an entertainment center on a single user interface. Previous AOL clients used by dial-up customers split the features into multiple windows.

A release date for the final version of the software, which is supported by advertising revenue rather than subscription fees, has not yet been announced.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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