Indians want Klamath River dams removed

Aug 03, 2006

U.S. Indian tribes living along the Klamath River staged a rally in Portland, Ore., demanding removal of four hydroelectric dams.

The Indians say the dams block salmon from reaching spawning grounds upriver, The New York Times reported. The Yurok and Karuk tribes in California and the Klamath tribes of Oregon plan to ask Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski and California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to help push for the dams' removal.

The PacifiCorp -- the power company that owns the dams -- issued a statement coinciding with Wednesday's rally that said: "We have heard the tribes' concerns. We are not opposed to dam removal or other settlement opportunities as long as our customers are not harmed and our property rights are respected."

Craig Tucker, a spokesman for the 3,400-member Karuk tribe, told the Times the tribes want Kulongoski and Schwarzenegger to find a way to pay for removing the dams, provide power from other sources and restore fish habitat along the river, which begins in southern Oregon and reaches the Pacific Ocean in Northern California.

The U.S. National Marine Fisheries Service supports the removal of the dams to facilitate salmon spawning.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Scientists investigate link between skyrocketing sea slug populations and warming seas

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

How can Google snap its stock out of its stupor?

1 hour ago

Google has turned into a stock market laggard as the shift to mobile devices has lowered the Internet search leader's digital ad prices and the company's expensive investments in far-out technology has trimmed ...

Recommended for you

Distinctive sounds announce iceberg births

7 hours ago

Underwater sounds can be used to detect different ways glaciers lose ice as they flow into the ocean, giving scientists new insight into these poorly understood events, according to new research.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.