IBM, T3Ci test RFID data-sorting software

Jul 28, 2006

IBM and partner T3Ci say they have completed interoperability testing of a new software standard for Radio frequency identification technology.

The research involves software that should provide faster and more-precise queries and exchanges of data between trading partners and manufacturers along the supply chain.

RFID is being used increasingly to track the flow of goods from factory to distributor to end user. The new software is designed to more-quickly sort through the large volume of data provided by RFID tags and answer specific questions in near real time.

The companies said in a news release Thursday that the testing was an initial step toward "interoperability based on the Electronic Product Code Information Services (EPCIS) for exchange and query of RFID data."

They also said U.S. home products manufacturer Unilever had agreed to trial EPCIS with the RFID data input by its vast retail base.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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