California heat wave may be global warming

Jul 25, 2006

Scientists say although summer usually brings "heat waves," California's recent record high temperatures might be the result of global warming.

Taken by itself, California's heat wave isn't out of the ordinary, Don Whitlow, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, told the San Diego Union-Tribune.

"It's summer. And it's hot," said Whitlow. "Natural cycles happen."

But "hot" might be an understatement: In El Cajon, Saturday's temperature reached 113 degrees -- 12 degrees higher than the previous record. In Escondido, where the previous record high was 96, it hit 112.

Although looking at yearly temperatures during the past 100 years would find similar variations, climate experts told the Union-Tribune such temperature spikes may be occurring more frequently and more fiercely because of global warming.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on wildlife

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Hoverbike drone project for air transport takes off

8 hours ago

What happens when you cross a helicopter with a motorbike? The crew at Malloy Aeronautics has been focused on a viable answer and has launched a crowdfunding campaign to support its Hoverbike project, "The ...

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat

8 hours ago

Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals. However, a new study indicates ...

'Shocking' underground water loss in US drought

9 hours ago

A major drought across the western United States has sapped underground water resources, posing a greater threat to the water supply than previously understood, scientists said Thursday.

Recommended for you

Big data confirms climate extremes are here to stay

8 hours ago

In a paper published online today in the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature, Northeastern researchers Evan Kodra and Auroop Ganguly found that while global temperature is indeed increasing, so too is the variab ...

How might climate change affect our food supply?

9 hours ago

It's no easy question to answer, but prudence demands that we try. Thus, Microsoft and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have teamed up to tackle "food resilience," one of several themes ...

Groundwater is safe in potential N.Y. fracking area

9 hours ago

Two Cornell hydrologists have completed a thorough groundwater examination of drinking water in a potential hydraulic fracturing area in New York's Southern Tier. They determined that drinking water in potable ...

User comments : 0