NASA examines Hubble camera problem

Jun 27, 2006
Hubble Space Telescope
Hubble Space Telescope

NASA engineers continue to examine the issues surrounding a problem related to the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the agency's Hubble Space Telescope.

Engineers received indications on Monday, June 19, that the power supply voltages were out of acceptable limits, causing the camera to stop functioning. The camera has been taken off line so engineers can study the problem and determine the appropriate remedy. Hubble observations are continuing using the other science instruments on board.

"We believe we are very close to fully understanding the issue experienced with the camera and we are going to resolve it," said Ed Ruitberg, deputy associate director, Astrophysics Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. "However, before we proceed with any actions, we want to have a review board meeting to assess both the trouble-shooting and the proposed solution."

The board will meet at Goddard Thursday, June 29, to decide the best course of action. Engineers anticipate instrument observations will resume no earlier than July 3, with no degradation to performance.

Hubble managers will host a media teleconference Friday morning. Details will be announced following completion of the review board meeting, which may continue throughout Thursday.

Source: NASA

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