Weather modification takes another step

Jun 26, 2006

A Florida man's theory of weakening a hurricane through the introduction of absorbent powder illustrates a new trend in science, weather modification.

While China currently seeds clouds for rain and Canadian companies attempt to limit incoming hailstorms, this newest weather modification theory created by Peter Cordani focuses on virtually eliminating the destructive force of a hurricane, the Chicago Tribune reports.

Cordani postulates that by introducing 400 tons of super-absorbent powder into a hurricane, the moisture -- and therefore the power of the hurricane -- would be limited.

"We know it would suck the moisture out," the entrepreneur told the Tribune. "The only thing we don't know about is the (impact on a) hurricane and the aftereffects."

Cordani said he has spent over $1 million on his project, which still remains significantly in its infancy and faces strong opposition.

"You're really playing with fire, because if you don't understand the fundamentals of what you're doing, you have no ability to predict the consequence of your actions," atmospheric scientist Michael Garstang said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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