U.S. scientists develop disaster software

Jun 08, 2006

U.S. government scientists have developed software for managing collection, visualization, and analysis of environmental sampling data.

The Sandia National Laboratory's software system -- the Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model, or BROOM, -- is designed to assist officials in cleaning and returning to service contaminated buildings and facilities affected by a disaster.

Researchers say the software provides an efficient and scientifically defensible approach to planning and executing sampling and cleanup activities.

Originally developed for use following a bioterrorism attack, officials say BROOM is easily adapted to other spatial domains where accurate and efficient data tracking, management, optimization, and analysis of samples are needed.

The three-year development project was funded by the Department of Homeland Security.

Sandia is a National Nuclear Security Administration laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lockheed Martin Corp.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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