Pathologist: No soybean rust forecast yet

May 31, 2006

Purdue University plant pathologist Greg Shaner says there's no forecast, as yet, for 2006 Midwest soybean rust, with much depending upon weather patterns.

Shaner said only time and weather conditions will determine whether Asian soybean rust moves into the Midwest this year.

As much as agricultural researchers learned about the fungal disease last year, they still can't say if and when rust will infect the Corn Belt, Shaner said. He advises producers to keep a close eye on their fields and on weather reports this season.

"We've had so little experience with this disease in the United States that it's really difficult to say what our risk for rust infection is in the Midwest," Shaner said. "I think most people feel that here in the Corn Belt we're not likely to see rust before soybeans flower in late July and August, and probably even later than that."

Last year soybean rust was confined to the southern United States, never moving north of the Mason-Dixon Line. So far this year, rust infection has been reported Florida, Georgia, Alabama and the southern tip of Texas.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA and NOAA's nighttime and daytime views of the blizzard of 2015

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Law enforcement personnel using see-through radar tech

3 hours ago

Radar that 'sees' through walls has raised privacy concerns, said the BBC on Tuesday. At least 50 US police forces are believed to be equipped with radar devices that can send signals through walls. The ra ...

Goshawk hunt and prey-evasion strategies revealed

4 hours ago

Stealth is the goshawk's greatest asset. Plummeting out of the air, the raptors fix their gaze on the oblivious victim below. Intrigued by the birds' attack tactics, Suzanne Amador Kane from Haverford College, USA, decided ...

Recommended for you

On the right track for tropical clouds

10 hours ago

Think of a tropical storm about the size of Alaska. Large and lumbering, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) affects weather patterns in every corner of the world. Unlike its well-known cousin El Niño, the ...

SMAP will track a tiny cog that keeps cycles spinning

12 hours ago

When you open the back of a fine watch, you see layer upon layer of spinning wheels linked by interlocking cogs, screws and wires. Some of the cogs are so tiny they're barely visible. Size doesn't matter—what's ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.