3,000-year-old skeleton found in Rome

May 31, 2006

Italian archaeologists say they have found a well preserved, 3,000-year-old skeleton of a woman during a dig in the Roman Forum in central Rome.

The Bronze Age skeleton dates to at least 300 years before the traditional date used for the founding of Rome, 753 B.C., the BBC reported Wednesday. Archaeologists said it has long been known Bronze Age people lived at the site that was to become Rome.

Archaeologist Anna De Santis, who took part in the dig, told the BBC the woman was about 30 years old, when she died. De Santis said it is an unusual discovery, since it was customary for most prehistoric people to cremate their dead.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Dinosaur footprints set for public display in Utah

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Canada to push Arctic claim in Europe

16 minutes ago

Canada's top diplomat will discuss the Arctic with his Scandinavian counterparts in Denmark and Norway next week, it was announced Thursday, a trip that will raise suspicions in Russia.

Google to help boost Greece's tourism industry

26 minutes ago

Internet giant Google will offer management courses to 3,000 tourism businesses on the island of Crete as part of an initiative to promote the sector in Greece, industry union Sete said on Thursday.

Ice cream goes Southern, okra extracts may increase shelf-life

36 minutes ago

While okra has been widely used as a vegetable for soups and stews, a new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), shows how okra extracts can be used as a stabilizer in ice ...

NKorea launch pad expansion 'nearing completion'

55 minutes ago

A U.S. research institute says construction to upgrade North Korea's main rocket launch pad should be completed by fall, allowing Pyongyang (pyuhng-yahng) to conduct a launch by year's end if it decides to do so.

Recommended for you

Dinosaur footprints set for public display in Utah

18 hours ago

A dry wash full of 112-million-year-old dinosaur tracks that include an ankylosaurus, dromaeosaurus and a menacing ancestor of the Tyrannosaurus rex, is set to open to the public this fall in Utah.

Fossil arthropod went on the hunt for its prey

Aug 22, 2014

A new species of carnivorous crustacean has been identified, which roamed the seas 435 million years ago, grasping its prey with spiny limbs before devouring it. The fossil is described and details of its lifestyle are published ...

User comments : 0