NASA names new management administrator

May 22, 2006
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Charles Scales, a NASA veteran of more than 33 years, Monday was named associate administrator of its Office of Institutions and Management.

In his new position, Scales will direct NASA's operational and management support activities. Officials said he will be responsible for ensuring the agency work force, infrastructure, and facility capabilities are working together in support of NASA's long-range needs.

Scales has been deputy director of operations at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., since 2005. Prior to that, he served as director of the Center Operations Directorate at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland.

Scales began his NASA career in 1973 as a cooperative education student at Marshall. He earned a bachelor's degree in general business from Alabama A&M University and joined the center's Institutional and Program Support Directorate as a communications specialist in 1975.

Scales has earned a number of awards, including the Silver Snoopy Award, the highest award bestowed by astronauts for outstanding contributions to flight safety and mission success.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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