In Brief: China cell-phone rate cuts criticized

May 11, 2006

China Mobile's reduction of wireless-phone rates in Beijing has apparently gotten a lukewarm reception from the public.

Subscribers told the Xinhua news service say the cuts would have little impact on their bills because they apply primarily to monthly calling plans that they generally can't afford.

One China Mobile customer said, "The new measures are meaningless to users who do not make or answer many phone calls."

The Chinese government estimates that Beijing residents spend an average of 70 yuan ($8.75) per month on phones; however, the new China Mobile monthly rates start at 80 yuan ($10).

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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