3-D video for cell phones unveiled

May 08, 2006

California's DDD Group said Monday it had developed a 3-D video solution for cell phones.

The DDD Mobile solution will support 3-D for photos, wallpapers, animation and movies shown on wireless handsets using Texas Instruments OMAP processors.

"The availability of DDD Mobile now makes it possible for handset makers to incorporate the latest 3D LCD displays within their next-generation, OMAP processor-based wireless products," DDD said in a news release.

DDD Mobile was the result of collaboration with Britain's Ocuity Ltd., which enhanced a standard 2-D handset display that maintains clarity and brightness and does not require the user to wear now-outdated 3-D glasses.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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