New satellite service for disaster teams

May 03, 2006

Global Relief Technologies, GeoEye and Telenor launched a joint venture to provide satellite imagery to disaster-relief teams in remote areas of the world.

The product is designed to feed pictures from space directly to crews on the scene for use in mapping the deployment of resources.

"Humanitarian and emergency response organizations' demand for satellite imagery has persisted from one crisis to another," said James Abrahamson, a former U.S. Air Force general and now a member of the GRT board. "Facilitating the delivery of map-accurate satellite imagery is of critical importance to emergency workers since it provides a common operating picture that is invaluable to relief operations."

In the recent past, relief organizations have had to depend on U.S. government satellites for their bird's-eye view of the impacted areas they were being deployed in. The process was time-consuming and gave managers only limited views.

With the launch of Broadband Global Area Network, satellite operator Telenor is now able to transmit large amounts of data in a format that will allow detailed pictures to be downloaded in remote areas on laptops and PDAs.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: FCC to propose pay-for-priority Internet standards (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

When waters rise: NASA improves flood safety

Mar 20, 2014

Flooding is the most frequent and widespread weather-related natural disaster, taking a huge toll in lives and property each year. NASA Earth-observing satellites and airborne missions provide vital information ...

Millions join satellite search for missing plane

Mar 18, 2014

Three million people have joined an effort led by a satellite operator to locate the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, in what may be the largest crowdsourcing project of its kind.

Rescued Antarctic scientists back on dry land

Jan 22, 2014

Scientists whose Antarctic expedition became trapped in sea ice finally returned to dry land Wednesday, apologising for the disruption and facing questions over who will pay for the international rescue mission.

Recommended for you

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

Apr 23, 2014

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Hundreds in Mexico protest telecommunications law

Apr 23, 2014

Hundreds of students and activists marched in Mexico's capital Tuesday to protest a telecommunications law being debated by the Senate that they say will allow the government to arbitrarily censor Internet content.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...