Ancient Colorado river flowed backwards

Oct 04, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Geologists have found evidence that some 55 million years ago a river as big as the modern Colorado flowed through Arizona into Utah in the opposite direction from the present-day river. Writing in the October issue of the journal Geology, they have named this ancient northeastward-flowing river the California River, after its inferred source in the Mojave region of southern California.

Lead author Steven Davis, a post-doctoral researcher in the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution, and his colleagues discovered the ancient by comparing sedimentary deposits in Utah and southwest Arizona. By analyzing the uranium and lead isotopes in sand grains made of the mineral zircon, the researchers were able to determine that the sand at both localities came from the same source -- igneous bedrock in the Mojave region of southern California.

The river deposits in Utah, called the Colton Formation by geologists, formed a delta where the river emptied into a large lake. They are more than 400 miles (700 kilometers) to the northeast of their source in California. "The river was on a very similar scale to the modern Colorado-Green River system," says Davis, "but it flowed in the opposite direction." The modern Colorado River's headwaters are in the , flowing southeast to the river's mouth in the Gulf of California.

The deposits of the Colton Formation are approximately 55 million years old. Recently, other researchers have speculated that older than the Colorado River may have carved an ancestral or "proto" Grand Canyon around this time, long before Colorado began eroding the present canyon less than 20 million years ago. But Davis sees no evidence of this. "The Grand Canyon would have been on the river's route as it flowed from the Mojave to Utah, he says. "It stands to reason that if there was major erosion of a canyon going on we would see lots of zircon grains from that area, but we don't."

The mighty California River likely met its end as the Rocky Mountains rose and the northern Colorado Plateau tilted, reversing the slope of the land surface and the direction of the river's flow to create the present Colorado-Green River system. Davis and his colleagues have not determined precisely when the change occurred, however. "The river could have persisted for as long as 20 million years before the topography shifted enough to reverse its flow," he says.

Explore further: Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Provided by Carnegie Institution

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kevinrtrs
1 / 5 (3) Oct 05, 2010
"It stands to reason that if there was major erosion of a canyon going on we would see lots of zircon grains from that area, but we do not."

It also stands to reason that if the different layers in the current grand Canyon are examined there's an equally scarcity of zircons, indicating exactly the same lack of erosion between layers. This therefore leads one to ask how those layers formed over periods of millions of years if there's no erosion between the layers?
An alternative explanation which fits the data better would be that the layers formed much too quickly for any erosion to register. Hence one is forced to consider a catastrophe of major proportions required to form the Grand Canyon walls in a blink of current geological time. My suggestion is that most if not all major canyons were formed by catastrophic means in the space of a few months, not by constant erosion over millions of years.
Current dam-burst research clearly shows this is possible. Erosion does not.

Skeptic_Heretic
3 / 5 (2) Oct 05, 2010
Kevin,

Then explain why the Grand Canyon meaders.
barakn
3.7 / 5 (3) Oct 05, 2010
It also stands to reason that if the different layers in the current grand Canyon are examined there's an equally scarcity of zircons, indicating exactly the same lack of erosion between layers.

Well, there he goes again making up facts to support his preconceived notions.

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