Related topics: water · climate change

Europe's Rhine River runs dry

Water levels on the Rhine River, Europe's second-largest river, have continued to drop owing to soaring temperatures and lack of rainfall, preventing many vessels from navigating through the waters at full capacity. The Copernicus ...

In scorched UK, source of River Thames dries up

At the end of a dusty track in southwest England where the River Thames usually first emerges from the ground, there is currently scant sign of any moisture at all.

Below-average Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' measured

Today, NOAA-supported scientists announced that this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone"— an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and marine life—is approximately 3,275 square miles. That's more than 2 million acres ...

Hot, dry summer: Dutch government declares water shortage

The Dutch government declared a national water shortage Wednesday caused by the hot, dry summer that is parching much of Europe, and formed a national team to draw up measures to manage supplies, while asking the public to ...

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River

A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing toward an ocean, a lake, a sea or another river. In a few cases, a river simply flows into the ground or dries up completely before reaching another body of water. Small rivers may also be called by several other names, including stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill; there is no general rule that defines what can be called a river. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; one example is Burn in Scotland and North-east England. Sometimes a river is said to be larger than a creek, but this is not always the case, due to vagueness in the language.

A river is part of the hydrological cycle. Water within a river is generally collected from precipitation through surface runoff, groundwater recharge, springs, and the release of stored water in natural ice and snowpacks (i.e., from glaciers).

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