Related topics: water · climate change

Some drought-imposed fishing limits lifted on Colorado River

Colorado lifted some fishing restrictions along a stretch of the Colorado River on Tuesday, but biologists warn that historically low water flows caused by a drought in the U.S. West, high water temperatures and wildfire ...

Satellites map floods in western Europe

Record rainfall has caused swollen rivers to burst their banks and wash away homes and other buildings in western Europe—leading to more than 90 casualties and over 1000 people missing. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 ...

The delicate balance of protecting river deltas and society

Hundreds of millions of people live on river deltas around the world, making them central to rich diversity in culture and thriving economies. As deltas face environmental degradation and ongoing climate change, governments ...

Third Pole faces major changes in water flows

Snow cover and glaciers at the Third Pole are disappearing fast as a result of global warming. A joint research team modeled the Third Pole water cycling to see what the future has in store for the region.

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River

A river is a natural watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing toward an ocean, a lake, a sea or another river. In a few cases, a river simply flows into the ground or dries up completely before reaching another body of water. Small rivers may also be called by several other names, including stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill; there is no general rule that defines what can be called a river. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; one example is Burn in Scotland and North-east England. Sometimes a river is said to be larger than a creek, but this is not always the case, due to vagueness in the language.

A river is part of the hydrological cycle. Water within a river is generally collected from precipitation through surface runoff, groundwater recharge, springs, and the release of stored water in natural ice and snowpacks (i.e., from glaciers).

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