1,000 computer hackers meet in Budapest

Sep 18, 2010
Participants pictured at a climate conference in Budapest in 2008. Hacktivity 2010, the largest computer hackers' conference in eastern Europe, kicked off in Budapest on Saturday, with some 1,000 participants expected to attend the two-day event.

Hacktivity 2010, the largest computer hackers' conference in eastern Europe, kicked off Saturday, with some 1,000 participants expected to attend the two-day event, according to organisers.

The conference was to bring together officials and computer experts from Hungary and abroad in an informal setting, combining lectures and discussions on serious issues such as , with lighter fare and games.

Bruce Scheier, a world-renowned expert, opened the congress with a keynote speech.

Other well-known participants and lecturers included Alexander Kornbrust of Oracle, Robert Lipovsky form the ESET computer security company's laboratory in Bratislava, and US Mitch Altman, who was organising a hardware workshop.

Meanwhile, in the leisure zone, participants could test their ability to break into systems and take control of foreign computers in a variety of games, from "Hack the Vendor," to "Capture the Flag."

More information about the event is available on the following Internet site: hacktivity.hu/

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ricarguy
1 / 5 (1) Sep 20, 2010
I can understand computer security experts meeting with their former nemeses out there to improve security overall, but, and call me old fashioned,...
Isn't this like getting a bunch of burglars and spies together and organizing games for them like "see if you can break into this bank, the store over there or that gov't office?" This feels in part like legitimizing criminal behavior. But I suppose it's OK because these guys are (now) doing it as a hobby for fun? Am I misunderstanding at least part of this?