WikiLeaks to release cache of Iraq war documents: Newsweek

Sep 10, 2010
The homepage of the WikiLeaks.org website is seen on a computer after leaked classified military documents were posted to it July 2010 in Miami, Florida. Whistleblower website WikiLeaks is teaming up with news outlets to release a "massive cache" of classified US military field reports on the conflict in Iraq, Newsweek magazine reported on Friday.

Whistleblower website WikiLeaks is teaming up with news outlets to release a "massive cache" of classified US military field reports on the conflict in Iraq, Newsweek magazine reported on Friday.

Newsweek quoted Iain Overton, editor of The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, a London-based journalism nonprofit, as saying the material constitutes the "biggest leak of military intelligence" ever.

said the stash of Iraq documents held by is believed to be about three times as large as the number of US military field reports on Afghanistan released earlier this year by WikiLeaks.

WikiLeaks, in collaboration with The , Britain's Guardian and Der Spiegel of Germany, published 77,000 documents in July and has said it will release another 15,000 related documents soon.

Overton told Newsweek that his organization was working with WikiLeaks and television and print media in several countries on stories and programs based on the Iraq documents.

He declined to identify the news organizations involved but said they would release the material simultaneously several weeks from now.

Overton also said his organization was aware that information in the documents could potentially put lives at risk and "we're taking it very seriously."

Newsweek said it was unclear what role WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is playing in the current project.

Assange, 39, is facing an investigation by Swedish prosecutors over rape allegations, charges he strongly denied this week in an interview with AFP.

Assange also said "the Swedish case has caused delays, significant delays in all of our projects.

"It's been an enormous disruption," he said.

Explore further: Turkey still hopes Twitter will open local office

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sweden withdraws warrant for WikiLeaks founder

Aug 21, 2010

(AP) -- Swedish prosecutors withdrew an arrest warrant for the founder of WikiLeaks on Saturday, saying less than a day after the document was issued that it was based on an unfounded accusation of rape.

WikiLeaks: Pentagon ready to discuss Afghan files

Aug 18, 2010

(AP) -- WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Wednesday the Pentagon has expressed willingness to discuss the online whistleblower's request for help in reviewing classified documents from the Afghan war ...

Swedish prosecutors defend WikiLeaks about-face

Aug 22, 2010

(AP) -- Swedish prosecutors defended their handling of a rape allegation against the founder of WikiLeaks, saying Sunday that they had made no mistakes in issuing an arrest warrant and withdrawing it less ...

Recommended for you

White House updating online privacy policy

3 hours ago

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

Net neutrality balancing act

22 hours ago

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

Apr 16, 2014

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

Apr 16, 2014

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Sep 11, 2010
Assange also said "the Swedish case has caused delays, significant delays in all of our projects.

"It's been an enormous disruption," he said.


Admitting this publicly may cause more such disruptions. But, it may also be a clever move, since it might get the "opponents" devising court cases, instad of "an unfortunate, fatal accident" for Mr. Assange.

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Venture investments jump to $9.5B in 1Q

Funding for U.S. startup companies soared 57 percent in the first quarter to a level not seen since 2001, as venture capitalists piled more money into an increasing number of deals, according to a report due out Friday.

White House updating online privacy policy

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

Male monkey filmed caring for dying mate (w/ Video)

(Phys.org) —The incident was captured by Dr Bruna Bezerra and colleagues in the Atlantic Forest in the Northeast of Brazil.  Dr Bezerra is a Research Associate at the University of Bristol and a Professor ...

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Research done by U.S. scientists in the Cayman Islands suggests that native predators can be trained to gobble up invasive lionfish that colonize regional reefs and voraciously prey on juvenile marine creatures.