Hong Kong seizes 1.5 tonnes of smuggled elephant ivory

Sep 10, 2010
A pile of seized elephant tusks in Hong Kong in 2006. Hong Kong customs officers said Friday they have seized over one and a half tonnes of smuggled elephant ivory worth 10.9 million Hong Kong dollars (1.3 million US) shipped from Tanzania.

Hong Kong customs officers have seized over one and a half tonnes of smuggled elephant ivory worth 10.9 million Hong Kong dollars (1.3 million US) shipped from Tanzania, they said Friday.

The 384 ivory tusks -- weighing 1.55 tonnes -- were found Thursday inside two containers labelled as "dried anchovies" at the Tsing Yi container terminal, the Ports and Maritime Command said in a statement.

Two men, aged 46 and 48, have been arrested as part of a continuing investigation, the statement said..

The international trade in elephant ivory, with rare exceptions, has been outlawed since 1989 after elephant populations in Africa dropped from the millions in the mid-20th century to some 600,000 by the end of the 1980s.

Anyone found guilty of importing unmanifested cargo into Hong Kong faces a fine up to two million dollars (260,000 US) and imprisonment for seven years.

In addition, those guilty of importing, exporting or possessing an for commercial purposes face a fine of up to five million dollars (640,000 US) and two years in jail, the statement said.

Kenya seized two tonnes of raw elephant ivory bound for Asian markets in August, saying it represented the country's largest recovery of in the recent past.

At least 4,000 are killed each year across Africa to supply the illegal ivory trade, according to the conservation group WWF.

Explore further: Man 'expelled from Croatia for punching monk seal'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Extinct mammoth tusks fill elephant ivory ban gap

Aug 13, 2010

Stumped by a ban designed to save elephants from extinction, Hong Kong's master carvers turned to a long dead species that left thousands of tonnes of frozen ivory in Siberian mass graves.

UN rejects Tanzania request for one-off ivory sale

Mar 22, 2010

(AP) -- A proposal by Tanzania to weaken the 21-year ban on ivory sales was rejected by a U.N. conservation meeting over fears the African country has been failing to crack down on rising incidents of poaching.

Elephant-size loopholes sustain Thai ivory trade

Jun 19, 2009

Legal loopholes and insufficient law enforcement mean that Thailand continues to harbour the largest illegal ivory market in Asia, says a new report from the wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC.

Recommended for you

Brother of Hibiscus is found alive and well on Maui

9 hours ago

Most people are familiar with Hibiscus flowers- they are an iconic symbol of tropical resorts worldwide where they are commonly planted in the landscape. Some, like Hawaii's State Flower- Hibiscus brackenridgei- are en ...

Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares

11 hours ago

While previous studies have shown that marine noise can affect animal movement and communication, with unknown ecological consequences, scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter and the École Pratique des Hautes ...

Classic Lewis Carroll character inspires new ecological model

Jul 30, 2014

Inspired by the Red Queen in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, collaborators from the University of Illinois and National University of Singapore improved a 35-year-old ecology model to better understand how species ...

Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants

Jul 30, 2014

Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks ...

User comments : 0