Related topics: species · extinction · conservationists

How I stumbled on a lost plant just north of Antarctica

Sunny interludes punctuate showers of rain, hail and sleet as furious winds sweep clouds across the sky. It's a typical summer day on Macquarie Island, a sliver of ocean floor that rose more than 2.5 km from the depths of ...

Science Says: Why biodiversity matters to you

You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say.

Crawling to extinction: Singapore turtle haven fights for life

Hundreds of turtles and tortoises, including rare and endangered species, face an uncertain future after their Singapore sanctuary—a Guinness World Record holder—was forced to relocate due to government redevelopment ...

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Endangered species

An endangered species is a population of organisms which is at risk of becoming extinct because it is either few in numbers, or threatened by changing environmental or predation parameters. An endangered species is usually a taxonomic species, but may be another evolutionary significant unit. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has calculated the percentage of endangered species as 40 percent of all organisms based on the sample of species that have been evaluated through 2006. (Note: the IUCN groups all threatened species for their summary purposes.) Many nations have laws offering protection to conservation reliant species: for example, forbidding hunting, restricting land development or creating preserves. Only a few of the many species at risk of extinction actually make it to the lists and obtain legal protection. Many more species become extinct, or potentially will become extinct, without gaining public notice.

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