Two thirds of Internet users hit by cybercrime: Norton

Sep 08, 2010

Computer security firm Symantec on Wednesday reported that about two thirds of the world's Internet users have fallen victim to cybercrime and few think crooks will be caught.

China was tops when it came to online victims, with 83 percent of there having been hit by computer viruses, identity theft, online or other crimes, according to a Norton Cybercrime Report.

Brazil and India were tied for second place with 76 percent, while the United States was next in line with 73 percent.

While victims admitted to feeling furious and cheated, they were reluctant to take action because they felt efforts would be futile, according to a study by consumer division Norton.

Reporting cybercrime is critical, because some times larger patterns can be pieced together by police fielding reports that, individually, appear minor.

"Cybercriminals purposely steal small amounts to remain undetected, but all of these add up," said Adam Palmer, Norton lead advisor.

"If you fail to report a loss, you may actually be helping the criminal stay under the radar."

A tendency by people to accept cybercrime was in part due to "learned helplessness," according to Joseph LaBrie, an associate professor of psychology at Loyola Marymount University.

"It's like getting ripped off at a garage -- if you don't know enough about cars, you don't argue with the mechanic," LaBrie said. "People just accept a situation, even if it feels bad."

The study revealed some moral gray zones; nearly half of those interviewed thought it was legal to download a single digital CD or movie without paying.

Some 24 percent of those surveyed saw nothing wrong with secretly reading someone else's email messages or Web browsing history.

"People resist protecting themselves and their computers because they think it's too complicated," said Anne Collier, co-director of ConnectSafely.org, a US non-profit group that collaborated with Norton on the study.

"But everyone can take simple steps, such as having up-to-date, comprehensive security software in place. In the case of online crime, an ounce of prevention is worth a ton of cure."

Explore further: Startups offer banking for smartphone users

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Distributed security

Jun 15, 2009

Could an entirely new approach to online security, based on distributed sanctions, help prevent cybercrime, fraud and identity theft? A report in the International Journal of Intercultural Information Management suggests it cou ...

Symantec Announced New Norton 360 - All-In-One Security

Feb 27, 2007

Symantec Corp. today announced the availability of its newest product – Norton 360 - All-In-One Security. Norton 360 comprehensive solution combines Symantec's security and PC tune-up technologies with new ...

Banner year for cybercrime

Dec 27, 2006

This was a year for the record books for computer crime with 2007 likely even more dire, Wednesday's Washington Post reported.

Recommended for you

Startups offer banking for smartphone users

Aug 30, 2014

The latest banks are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. Startups, such as Moven and Simple, offer banking that's designed specifically for smartphones, enabling users to track their spending on the go. Some things ...

'SwaziLeaks' looks to shake up jet-setting monarchy

Aug 29, 2014

As WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange prepares to end a two-year forced stay at Ecuador's London embassy, he may take comfort in knowing he inspired resistance to secrecy in places as far away as Swaziland.

Ecuador heralds digital currency plans (Update)

Aug 29, 2014

Ecuador is planning to create what it calls the world's first digital currency issued by a central bank, which some analysts believe could be a first step toward abandoning the country's existing currency, ...

WEF unveils 'crowdsourcing' push on how to run the Web

Aug 28, 2014

The World Economic Forum unveiled a project on Thursday aimed at connecting governments, businesses, academia, technicians and civil society worldwide to brainstorm the best ways to govern the Internet.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Ravenrant
1 / 5 (1) Sep 08, 2010
3 more cheers for hackers, right physorg posters?
trekgeek1
not rated yet Sep 08, 2010
3 more cheers for hackers, right physorg posters?


No. Strange, I wonder how many people know if they've been attacked. I've never had any problem despite using free antivirus software and only Windows firewall. I find it hard to believe that I'm lucky, and wonder if I have in fact been targeted.