Japan develops 'touchable' 3D TV technology

Aug 26, 2010
Children watch the giant image of a whale shark on a huge screen in Tokyo. A Japanese research team has said Thursday it had developed the world's first 3D television system that allows users to touch, pinch or poke images floating in front of them.

A Japanese research team said Thursday it had developed the world's first 3D television system that allows users to touch, pinch or poke images floating in front of them.

"It is the first time that you can feel images in the air," said Norio Nakamura, senior scientist with the research team at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology.

"You can have the sense of touch like poking a rubber ball or stretching a sticky rice cake" when manipulating images, he told AFP by telephone.

The technology changes the shape of in response to "touches", aided by cameras that monitor how the fingers move, Nakamura said.

It is not known when the technology will be put to practical use but its creators see it being used to simulate surgical operations and in video game software allowing players to experience the sensation of holding weapons or sports equipment.

It could even use scanned images to supplement existing realities, said Nakamura.

"This technology could create a virtual museum where visitors, including vision-impaired people, can put their hands on valuable sculptures that are usually untouchable," Nakamura said.

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User comments : 17

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Eco_R1
Aug 26, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
drunken_lizard
4.2 / 5 (5) Aug 26, 2010
one word comes to mind within few atto seconds, PORN!!!


It is the driving force behind all new media...
krundoloss
4.8 / 5 (6) Aug 26, 2010
I think they are making this sound better than it is. If you read closely, they just say "images change in response to hand motions" not that you can feel the cold metal of a gun, or a warm boob. lol.
Aloken
5 / 5 (1) Aug 26, 2010
I think they are making this sound better than it is. If you read closely, they just say "images change in response to hand motions" not that you can feel the cold metal of a gun, or a warm boob. lol.


No, they say more than just that...

"You can have the sense of touch like poking a rubber ball or stretching a sticky rice cake" when manipulating images, he told AFP by telephone.


Too bad they provide no insight whatsoever as to how this technology works (the sensing part I mean).
Oxensraiser?
4.3 / 5 (7) Aug 26, 2010
Ah, holodeck technology. I know alot of people who want to fight a Klingon Bruce Lee, me included.
ArcainOne
5 / 5 (3) Aug 26, 2010
Ah, holodeck technology. I know alot of people who want to fight a Klingon Bruce Lee, me included.


yeah... fight Klingon Bruce lee... ::inserts Pamela Lee video:: hehe

seriously though, the one thing I am some what disappointed is I was kind of interested in HOW this technology works... they kind of skipped over that part. They describe how the Manipulation (with tiny cameras) works but not the sensation. Maybe I missed something...
gunslingor1
4.8 / 5 (4) Aug 26, 2010
I too think they are making it sound a hell of a lot better than it is. Those sensational statements sound like a salesman who doesn't know anything about the product. If it really did what he was implying, this would be a breakthrough of biblical proportions. It would be studied by physics dudes around the world... quite literally hundreds of technological hurdles would have to be overcome... there is just no way, no way at all.

I think really it's just a multitouch sensitive screen with reaction based animations.
labtvonline
not rated yet Aug 26, 2010
The possibilities are literally endless with this type of technology. I would love to see a video of this in action. I know a while back I saw a video about a similar, hologram like image that was projected in 3D. I'll post the link to it. I wonder if this is the type of technology they are talking about.

http://www.ndep.u...nference

Semmster
5 / 5 (1) Aug 26, 2010
one word comes to mind within few atto seconds, PORN!!!

Whew! for a moment I thought, "What kind of person am I?!"
Nik_2213
not rated yet Aug 26, 2010
Sadly, the AIST site is uninformative.
Musashi
not rated yet Aug 26, 2010
I have a hard time believing the article is THAT deceptive. They even point out how vision-impaired people can "put their hands on valuable sculptures". If the screen isn't reactive (is that the term?) there is no point. What's the interest of touching a sculpture if you only feel the screen, and can't see it?
HealingMindN
1 / 5 (1) Aug 26, 2010
What's the interest of touching a sculpture if you only feel the screen, and can't see it?

What do blind people tell you when you ask that?

Considering the pic at the headline, I believe they're aiming the app more at kids than porn experts because it would be rudimentary. I mean how can they duplicate red hot, heaving, sweating, pulsating flesh?
Musashi
not rated yet Aug 26, 2010
What do blind people tell you when you ask that?

Instead of going out of my way to ask a blind person the point of "touching" a sculpture on a screen that feels like a screen, I opted to close my eyes and imagine the point. Fancy that... there isn't one. Point being, it's a rather elaborate description for a function the TV might not have.
eurekalogic
not rated yet Aug 27, 2010
Bah!, when they can turn mind reading devices into mind sending devices so they can send the image and feelings directly to the brain call me so I can say wow.
BrianH
not rated yet Aug 27, 2010
Maybe a haptic glove that stimulates the skin. Scratch a Great White Shark, or poke a tiger in the eye, or bitch-slap a cobra, or sky-dive onto concrete with no chute, or ...

ElasfarSovereign
Aug 29, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
derphysiker
not rated yet Aug 30, 2010
I call bullshit and snake-oil!

To make images touchable there must be something there to touch. 3D-images in the air only consist of air and light. Unless they have invented the long-sought force-field-generator, there will nothing be there to touch, no resistance to the poking finger.
Eco_R1
not rated yet Aug 30, 2010
the best way to do this is gonna be a neural interface.
Mike_Bailey
not rated yet Sep 02, 2010
I don't know where the original Physorg article is because it was so long ago, however the Japanese have already created an electromagnetic force field generator. In its original form it was a 3 foot by 3 foot by 3 foot cube with its internals hidden, that had a chrome colored bowl sunk down into the top. It was plugged into a computer that used a 3d image to create a 3d EM object in the bowl that you could touch and feel the contours and texture of the 3d object on the screen. One example was petting a cat and feeling the fur. That is high resolution! It looks like this initial offering of "holodeck" technology is lower in resolution and power or it wouldn't be so stretchy or rubbery when touched. Presumably they did that on purpose to account for insufficient tactile force returned from the 3d EM "object"