WikiLeaks releases CIA analysis, no bombshell revelations

Aug 25, 2010
The homepage of the WikiLeaks.org website is seen on a computer in July, 2010. WikiLeaks on Wednesday released a CIA memo analyzing the risks of terrorists operating from the United States, but the document offered no dramatic revelations of government secrets like the website's earlier leaks.

WikiLeaks on Wednesday released a CIA memo analyzing the risks of terrorists operating from the United States, but the document offered no dramatic revelations of government secrets like the website's earlier leaks.

The CIA paper -- titled "What If Foreigners See the United States as an 'Exporter of Terrorism'?" -- examines the implications of extremists recruiting US nationals and using the United States as a base for attacks abroad.

The played down the release of the February memorandum, a so-called "red cell" analysis that is supposed to provide an alternative view to the spy agency's leaders.

"These sorts of analytic products -- clearly identified as coming from the agency's 'Red Cell' -- are designed simply to provoke thought and present different points of view," CIA spokesman George Little said in an email.

A US official, speaking on condition of anonymity, made light of the development and sought to ridicule , which had announced it was about to release a CIA document.

"This is not exactly a blockbuster paper," said the official.

The website is locked in a dispute with the Pentagon over the leaking of secret military documents on the .

It published nearly 77,000 classified US military documents on the war in Afghanistan on July 23 and has said it will publish another 15,000 within the next couple of weeks.

The short document posted Wednesday was a modest paper compared to the trove of files released in July, much of it raw intelligence reports.

The CIA memo posted Wednesday warns that the has long been used by Muslim and other militants as a base for staging terror attacks abroad.

But it said that US officials have tended to focus mainly on the threat from extremists planning attacks against US targets, and overlooked those who might be aiming at assaulting non-US targets abroad.

"Foreign terrorists have recruited homegrown US extremists for attacks abroad and are likely to increase the use of this method because so far it has slipped below the radar of the governments of the US and other countries," the memo said.

The problem carried potential legal issues that could hamper Washington's efforts to win the transfer of terror suspects to US soil, it said.

Explore further: Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Last Afghan WikiLeaks out in 'couple of weeks'

Aug 14, 2010

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange vowed Saturday to publish the last batch of secret documents on the Afghan war in "a couple of weeks", despite Pentagon pleas they would put further lives at risk.

WikiLeaks: We don't know source of leaked data

Jul 28, 2010

(AP) -- WikiLeaks' editor-in-chief claims his organization doesn't know who sent it some 91,000 secret U.S. military documents on the Afghan war, telling journalists the website was set up to hide the source ...

WikiLeaks: Pentagon ready to discuss Afghan files

Aug 18, 2010

(AP) -- WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Wednesday the Pentagon has expressed willingness to discuss the online whistleblower's request for help in reviewing classified documents from the Afghan war ...

WikiLeaks preparing to release more Afghan files

Aug 12, 2010

(AP) -- WikiLeaks spokesman Julian Assange said Thursday his organization is preparing to release the rest of the secret Afghan war documents it has on file. The Pentagon warned that would be more damaging to security and ...

Recommended for you

Twitter rules out Turkey office amid tax row

8 hours ago

Social networking company Twitter on Wednesday rejected demands from the Turkish government to open an office there, following accusations of tax evasion and a two-week ban on the service.

How does false information spread online?

10 hours ago

Last summer the World Economic Forum (WEF) invited its 1,500 council members to identify top trends facing the world, including what should be done about them. The WEF consists of 80 councils covering a wide range of issues including social media. Members come ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

ODesign
not rated yet Aug 25, 2010
If the wikileeks released a CIA analysis WAS a "bombshell", Wouldn't the CIA, in the interest of national security, spread disinformation throughout the more mainstream and censorship vulnerable media such as this website? Have they ever been caught spreading disinformation to international media through third parties or directly?

More news stories

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.