Google phones unseat BlackBerry as US best seller

Aug 05, 2010
A model displays a smartphone operating with Google's mobile operating system Android. NPD Group has reported that smartphones running on the web giant's software unseated BlackBerry devices as top-sellers in the United States during the second quarter of the year.

NPD Group has reported that smartphones running on Google-back Android software unseated BlackBerry devices as top-sellers in the United States during the second quarter of the year.

Android phones continued an "upward climb" in the US market, accounting for 33 percent of all smartphones purchased from the start of April through the end of June, according to the market tracking firm.

devices made by Canada-based were second with 28 percent while 22 percent of smartphone purchases were iPhones from Apple.

"While the Google-developed (operating system) took market share from RIM, Apple's saw a small gain this quarter on the strength of the 4 launch," said NPD executive director of analysis Ross Rubin.

The most popular phone was the Motorola Droid, followed by the Droid Incredible and the HTC Evo 4G.

RIM hopes it will have a hit on its hands with a freshly-unveiled Torch smartphone running on its new BlackBerry 6 software.

"Blackberry 6 will soon offer features that have been popular in recently launched Android handsets, such as support for capacitive touch-screens and a WebKit-based browser," Rubin said.

"However, the Blackberry Torch lacks the large screen allure that has characterized the best selling Android devices at its price point," Rubin said.

The NPD report supports figures released this week by Nielsen Company showing that Android smartphones are gaining ground in a hot US market.

"While the iPhone has been the headline grabber over the last few years in the smartphone market, Google's Android (operating system) has shown the most significant expansion in market share among current subscribers," Nielsen said in a release.

BlackBerry handsets continued to rule with 35 percent of the market while iPhones were second with 28 percent at the end of June, according to the results. Android smartphones had grown to 13 percent of the market.

Smartphones capable of data connections such as e-mail and Internet browsing made up 25 percent of the US market at the end of June and Nielsen predicted they would surpass the number of feature phones by the end of 2011.

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User comments : 10

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DaveGee
not rated yet Aug 05, 2010
Lets be a little fair about this can we?

RIM the SOLE manufacture of BlackBerry based devices markets what? Two, three, four 'versions' of their product in any given year.. Google the billion dollar gorilla invests in a cell phone OS and then gives it away to any and all manufacturers FOR FREE and at any given time there must be 20+ different Android based phones marketed by a bunch of random hardware manufacturers who all spend ZERO dollars in R&D (thanks to Uncle Google).

Am I the only one who finds this kind of comparison just a tad misleading?
AABB
not rated yet Aug 05, 2010
Lets be a little fair about this can we?

RIM the SOLE manufacture of BlackBerry based devices markets what? Two, three, four 'versions' of their product in any given year.. Google the billion dollar gorilla invests in a cell phone OS and then gives it away to any and all manufacturers FOR FREE and at any given time there must be 20+ different Android based phones marketed by a bunch of random hardware manufacturers who all spend ZERO dollars in R&D (thanks to Uncle Google).

Am I the only one who finds this kind of comparison just a tad misleading?


Nope...I am 99.999% sure that anyone can see this plainly. That said, this is just what the current market conditions dictate will be the more important criteria. One could argue that, given all you just enumerated about google, it is a remarkable achievement in itself to be able to bring cohesiveness (however fleeting or illusory) to a rag-tag bunch of handset manufacturers.
AABB
not rated yet Aug 05, 2010
Perhaps we as consumers could finally reap the benefits of all this in the form of more standardized hardware and software.
Aloken
not rated yet Aug 06, 2010
A software standard would be nice, not sure about hardware. What would manufacturers be able to do in order to have their products stand out besides the phones appearance?
AABB
not rated yet Aug 07, 2010
A hasty comment...what I really meant was that we could really use more standardization in the accessories and types of connectors/cables that all these sets use. I do hate to have to buy new adapters and cables w/ each new phone I get.
stm_wrp
not rated yet Aug 09, 2010
I gotta say that I'm a big fan of open source. It is easy to see a ton of innovation in the app dimension when they can all work together. I'm getting a new phone in a couple of months, and it will be my first smart phone. I highly anticipate the ability to get anything and everything.
DaveGee
not rated yet Aug 09, 2010
"Perhaps we as consumers could finally reap the benefits of all this in the form of more standardized hardware and software."

Don't look to Android for 'standard hardware' the Android platform has to be one of the most fragmented of them all...
AABB
not rated yet Aug 10, 2010
Don't look to Android for 'standard hardware' the Android platform has to be one of the most fragmented of them all...


Still, standardization of accessories/connectors is doable and as the platform matures, the OS environment will achieve more commonality across different devices.
zslewis91
not rated yet Aug 11, 2010
AABB, who are you, are you part of Android Dev. comm.?i doubt it, because i am. and also a ranking member in the webOS Dev. comm. and it sounds like your speakin of which you know nothing, go read so more forums and keep ill-conceived thoughts to yourself.
zslewis91
not rated yet Aug 11, 2010
"standardization of accessories/connectors is doable"

AABB, once more you know nothing, HTC "ExtUSB" is a Proprietary connectors and format, and if you know anything at all about El. hardware you know that its not at " doable" as you think. go read a book...or "wiki" something..AHAHAHA