Google phones gaining ground in US smartphone market

Aug 02, 2010
The Motorola Droid smartphone. Smartphones running on Google-backed Android software are gaining ground in a hot US market, according to figures released Monday by industry-tracker Nielsen Company.

Smartphones running on Google-backed Android software are gaining ground in a hot US market, according to figures released Monday by industry-tracker Nielsen Company.

"While the has been the headline grabber over the last few years in the smartphone market, Google's Android OS (operating system) has shown the most significant expansion in market share among current subscribers," Nielsen said in a release.

Android smartphones surged to 13 percent of the market, Nielsen reported.

The gain appeared to come at Microsoft's expense, with handsets based on Windows Mobile software dropping from 27 percent to 15 percent of the US market during the same one-year period.

Android handsets appeared to be on a hot streak, accounting for 27 percent of the smartphones activated in the in the first half of this year while iPhones accounted for 23 percent, according to Nielsen.

handsets from continued to be the most popular smartphones with 35 percent of the market while iPhones were second with 28 percent at the end of June, according to the results.

Smartphones capable of data connections such as e-mail and Internet browsing made up 25 percent of the US market at the end of June and Nielsen predicted they would surpass the number of feature phones by the end of 2011.

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Grallen
3 / 5 (1) Aug 03, 2010
People may not realize it yet, but these battles between companies for market share shape our future.

Policies set by government are more often made to accommodate power rather than to protect the people. Where you spend your money will more impact than your vote.

The Apple/Microsoft/Google struggle has more significance than you think. Next time you buy a handset, think about the policies, and track record, of the company you're supporting, rather than how you wish to be branded.

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