Final instruments on NASA climate/weather satellite integrated

Jul 22, 2010

The last of five instruments slated to fly on the upcoming NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) climate and weather satellite have been successfully integrated, according to NASA officials. The polar-orbiting satellite is scheduled to launch in late 2011.

The NPP was a pre-cursor mission to the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) that has recently been restructured. The last instrument, Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), is an advanced atmospheric sensor, built by ITT Corporation, Fort Wayne, Ind. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo., built the NPP spacecraft and is performing the integration and checkout of the NPP satellite.

The CrIS mechanical, electrical and performance testing was successfully completed and the NPP Satellite team is now working to finish the satellite Pre-Environmental Test baseline performance phase. The Environmental Test flow, which includes Dynamics, Electromagnetic Compatibility, and Thermal testing, is scheduled to begin this October.

The five-instrument suite will collect and distribute remotely sensed land, ocean, and atmospheric data to the meteorological and global climate change communities. It will provide atmospheric and sea surface temperatures, humidity sounding, land and ocean biological productivity, cloud and aerosol properties and total/profile ozone measurements.

Data produced by the CrIS instrument combined with data from the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, another NPP instrument, will provide global atmospheric temperature, moisture and pressure profiles from space.

The other three instruments include: the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite, which will collect information about atmospheric clouds, the earth radiation budget, clear-air land/water surfaces, sea surface temperature, ocean color, and produces low light visible imagery; the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite, which will monitor ozone and continue the daily global data produced by the current ozone monitoring systems, but with higher fidelity and the Cloud and Earth Radiant Energy System that will measure the Earth's radiant energy balance and help researchers to develop improved weather forecasts and climate model predictions.

The NPP mission is a NASA-managed project to provide continuity with NASA's Earth Observing System measurements and to provide risk reduction for the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) managed by the NPOESS Integrated Program Office, a tri-agency program made up of NASA, NOAA and the U.S. Department of Defense. However in 2010, due to cost overruns and delays, a task force led by the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy recommended against continuing NPOESS.

Explore further: Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New Environmental Satellite Successfully Launched

Feb 06, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new environmental satellite that will improve weather forecasting and monitor environmental events around the world soared into space this morning after a picture-perfect launch from Vandenberg ...

NASA, NOAA set to launch new environmental satellite

May 04, 2005

NASA is set to launch the new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES), another critical link in the development of a global Earth-observation program. The spa ...

GOES-15 Opens Its Infrared 'Eyes' for First Image

Apr 27, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- From approximately 22,236 miles in space, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) newest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - GOES-15 - took its ...

Recommended for you

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

2 hours ago

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

5 hours ago

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

21 hours ago

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Professional and amateur astronomers join forces

(Phys.org) —Long before the term "citizen science" was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...