Japan's Sharp to release triple-layer 100 GB Blu-ray disc

Jul 16, 2010
Japanese electronics giant Sharp employee displays the BDXL standard Blu-ray disc and its recorder "Aquos Blu-ray BD-HDW700" in Tokyo. Japanese electronics maker Sharp said Friday it will release a recordable Blu-ray disc this month that can store as much as four seasons of a television drama series.

Japanese electronics maker Sharp said Friday it will release a recordable Blu-ray disc this month that can store as much as four seasons of a television drama series.

The world's first triple-layer disc has a capacity of 100 gigabytes, twice as much as the dual-layer discs now on the market, Sharp said.

The write-once disc will be available in from July 30, with the price expected to be about 5,000 yen (60 dollars) each. Sharp will also sell recording machines compatible with the format.

The format allows users to record about 12 hours of terrestrial digital television broadcasts, or 8.6 hours of satellite digital broadcasts, at their original image quality, the company said.

If the image quality is lowered, recording time can be boosted by up to 10 times to make it possible to store a library of four entire seasons of a TV drama series on a single disc.

Explore further: Ineda developing low power companion processors to increase battery life for wearables

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Toshiba Announces 51GB Triple-Layer HD DVD-ROM Disc

Jan 09, 2007

Toshiba Corporation today underlined the versatility and high capacity of the HD DVD format with the announcement that the company has developed a triple-layer HD DVD-ROM (read only) disc with a capacity of ...

Universal Music Group Joins Blu-ray Disc Association

Aug 17, 2005

Universal Music Group (UMG) has joined the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) as a contributing member. The addition of Universal Music Group to the BDA's current lineup of more than 140 leading companies in the ...

Recommended for you

Visual search to shop: gimmick or game changing?

3 hours ago

Imagine using your phone to snap a photo of the cool pair of sunglasses your friend is wearing and instantly receiving a slew of information about the shades along with a link to order them.

WEF unveils 'crowdsourcing' push on how to run the Web

3 hours ago

The World Economic Forum unveiled a project on Thursday aimed at connecting governments, businesses, academia, technicians and civil society worldwide to brainstorm the best ways to govern the Internet.

Nigeria launches national identity card scheme

3 hours ago

Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan on Thursday launched a national electronic identity card scheme, which backers said would boost access to financial and government services in Africa's most populous nation.

SHORE facial analysis spots emotions on Google Glass

3 hours ago

One of the key concerns about facial recognition software has been over privacy. The very idea of having tracking mechanisms as part of an Internet-connected wearable would be likely to upset many privacy ...

User comments : 18

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Au-Pu
1 / 5 (2) Jul 16, 2010
To be perfectly honest from a user point of view, who really cares?
What does this actually do for me?
If I'm a technocrat it is wonderful, but only for me and only until someone else beats that.
Bob_Kob
5 / 5 (4) Jul 16, 2010
Yeah, honestly its been a long time since ive bought dvds, and don't plan on getting blu ray's either. While they are good, they're a bit late to the market. Internet + cheap harddrives have taken precedence.
Gerben_Mulder
not rated yet Jul 16, 2010
I think the real future lies in more direct accessible memory storage. like the exponential memory in stick cartridges, or just have all your stuff on the cloud. I hope captain Sulu will promote it thou.
denschmitz
5 / 5 (1) Jul 16, 2010
Impressive achievement, but it's obsolete before it even hits the streets.

CreepyD
5 / 5 (2) Jul 16, 2010
Absollutely pointless. You can buy a 250gb hard drive for a similar price these days with it's obvious speed/size/rewritable benefits.
Nemo
4.5 / 5 (2) Jul 16, 2010
Would be ok if the entire industry switched to this and DVDs were $10US for 50 pieces like they are now. Otherwise I have to agree, there is no point for the broad consumer market.
HaveYouConsidered
5 / 5 (1) Jul 16, 2010
I agree with these comments. Just yesterday I got spam email promoting 1.5 terabyte hard drives for just $99. But what's really needed is a reliable very long term backup/archive medium whose format and drives will not change--on purpose--for decades. (Here in the tropics my 10 yr. old DVDs are starting to fail.)

We used to call that technology "book publishing" but that method can't handle today's bandwidth, and data archivists have a big problem on their hands. Last month I was in Burbank, CA, and had the opportunity to tour the film vault at Warner Bros. Studios, where if the temperature and humidity is kept **exactly** right, they **might** get a couple hundred years life from their films. There are assets worth billions of dollars globally, looking for a good reliable long term data archive technology.
trekgeek1
not rated yet Jul 16, 2010
Agree with the comments. You need to buy a compatible recording device too? Much too expensive, when hard drives are bigger, and don't need new equipment for read/write. Great tech achievement, but a marketing failure.
baudrunner
not rated yet Jul 16, 2010
Just a couple of hundred years? That's nonsense. The film preservationists are standing in line to restore all those original celullose creations and store them in enhanced blue-ray format. They'll keep forever, since digital signals cannot degrade with regular backups. It's the storage media which can become obsolete, and even the format. However, I've seen ultra high resolution productions on an expensive Sharp display and it's more real than real. That's freaky.
getgoa
not rated yet Jul 16, 2010
hard drives are not 8-tracks, can't download online (illegal) and plug it in your vcr? the comments are oppressive and confusing.
HaveYouConsidered
4.5 / 5 (2) Jul 16, 2010
Baudrunner: No, they don't keep forever. The media degrades, which means someone has to restore and recopy these archives frequently, at great expense. Just ask NASA, where they are having hard time recovering original data off of obsolete data tapes whose oxide is falling off. Also, in a world that's now ASCII encoded, just ask the guy who has warehouses full of EBCDIC encoded archives, etc. DVDs, CDs and Blu-ray delaminate. Every decade or two, the operating systems change, the drive data structure changes, basically everything changes. Old media become very difficult and costly to archive for long periods. Got any data on 8" floppy disks? Zip drive media from 1995? Quarter inch data tapes? 2" quadrature recorded videotape? Type B 1" format video tape? Betamax? You get the idea.
HaveYouConsidered
5 / 5 (1) Jul 16, 2010
Baudrunner: The reasons the major studios archive their films as original film are several.

No digital copy of an analog master camera original negative is perfect. All such digital copies have quantization errors.

Sure they transfer these original films to digital formats, but these keep changing (e.g., 8-bits/pixel per color, now 10-bits. NTSC or PAL resolution previously, now HD resolution, or 2K or 4K lines etc.)

For long term archive, they stay on film. For color masters, the color dyes are subject to fading over time. These masters are optically separated and rephotographed as red-green-blue color separated images onto three pieces of black and white film stock, because the B&W films are silver based and don't fade. They pull these color separation rolls out of the vault and recombine them during digital transfers, back into a full color version of the original film.

But again, for long term archive, they stay on film and as analog masters...so far.
PTK
not rated yet Jul 17, 2010
i'f rather have all my pictures & business documents i dont want to lose on a disc than HDD,
when was the last time your blu-ray got corrupted or failed they are harder to scratch than DVD's even, common sense tells me HDD's are not reliable past 3-5 years so I try not store important data on them unless RAID├ęd
PTK
not rated yet Jul 17, 2010
When sending relatives pictures or movies, i'm not sure about you but i don't send a HDD through the mail, it's a DVD.
So obsolete for your purpose maybe, but there is still a use for them to many people.
Paradox
not rated yet Jul 18, 2010
I believe that online storage will soon be the norm for "almost" everything. No worries about one of your 500GB movie storage hard drive dying(like mine did). No need to "send" photos, they are just there, and friends can just go look at them.
Online with auto-backup.
Oh wait... that is already here!
CHollman82
5 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2010
hard drives are not 8-tracks, can't download online (illegal) and plug it in your vcr? the comments are oppressive and confusing.


What the hell are you talking about?

Who uses a VCR, who cares about VCR's?

You absolutely can legally download content onto your hard drive from a variety of sources including most major television networks, do you live in the 80's?

Sorry, but the comments before you are correct, this technology is useless. $60 for a 100gb write-once disc is a joke when you can buy a 500gb portable HDD for about the same price, and I'm not even going to bring up the burner that you must buy to write these things.

As for plugging in to a television, I can plug any portable hard drive into my TV through my PS3 and watch all the videos on it... but I wouldn't even bother at my own home when they can stream over the network to it.

I think your problem is that you are living in the past and have a poor understanding of what is possible and common today.
CHollman82
5 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2010
i'f rather have all my pictures & business documents i dont want to lose on a disc than HDD,
when was the last time your blu-ray got corrupted or failed they are harder to scratch than DVD's even, common sense tells me HDD's are not reliable past 3-5 years so I try not store important data on them unless RAIDéd


Common sense tells me you are abusing your hard drives or you buy cheap shit.

I have a 20gb drive from the early 90's that worked when I last tried it a few months ago, I have several others from the 90's that are over 10 years old that still work fine.

In fact, I have NEVER had a drive fail. I typically by Western Digital but there is a Maxtor or two in my old collection as well.
Jockster
not rated yet Aug 17, 2010
Ms Hollman you must have been very fortunate to have the only 20gb drive available in the early 90s. You mind telling me what brand (and what is hard drive abuse)?
I think most people have experienced multiple hard drive failures even with the brands you recommend, so other reliable recording media are quite a neat idea IMHO.