Study eyes egg quality and composition

Jul 07, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- There's no substantial quality difference between organically and conventionally produced eggs. That's one of a number of findings in an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) study examining various aspects of egg quality.

ARS food technologist Deana Jones and her team in the Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit in Athens, Ga., found that, on average, there was no substantial quality difference between types of eggs. So, no matter which specialty egg is chosen, it will be nearly the same quality as any other egg.

About 6.5 billion dozen shell eggs are produced each year in the United States, with a value of about $7 billion, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service.

The ARS team found the biggest difference was the size of egg within a carton between brown and white eggs. Though brown eggs weighed more, white shell eggs had higher percentages of total solids and crude fat. But, according to the study, there was no significant difference in the quality of white and brown eggs.

Quality is measured by Haugh units, named after Raymond Haugh. In 1937, he developed the Haugh unit as a correlation between egg weight and the height of the thick albumen, or thickest part of the egg white. The Haugh unit has become the most widely used measurement of interior egg quality and is considered to be the "gold standard" of interior egg quality determination.

Jones and her team conducted a survey of white and brown large-shell eggs with various production and nutritional differences such as traditional, cage-free, free-roaming, pasteurized, nutritionally-enhanced, and fertile. The goal was to determine if physical quality and compositional differences exist among these different .

Among the claims most often addressed on shell egg cartons are: husbandry practices, hen nutrition, enhanced egg nutrition (omega-3), organic and fertile. Pricing for these products is typically at a premium but can vary from market to market.

This research was published in the journal Poultry Science.

Explore further: The economics of newly graduated veterinarians

Provided by United States Department of Agriculture

3.5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Egg Processing Plant Carts Can Harbor Bacteria

Dec 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Plywood-shelved carts that are used to transport eggs into processing plants can harbor Enterobacteriaceae, according to a microbial survey conducted by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) ...

Gov't wants to trash stored egg powder

May 19, 2006

A U.S. attorney and the Food and Drug Administration want to destroy 24.75 tons of stored powdered eggs they claim are dangerous for people to eat.

The chicken was eaten before the egg

Apr 13, 2006

University of Nevada-Las Vegas scientists say they've confirmed Darwin's theory that many traits can be explained by the ancestral lineage of a species.

Recommended for you

Keep dogs and cats safe during winter

Dec 27, 2014

(HealthDay)—Winter can be tough on dogs and cats, but there are a number of safe and effective ways you can help them get through the cold season, an expert says.

Scientists target mess from Christmas tree needles

Dec 26, 2014

The presents are unwrapped. The children's shrieks of delight are just a memory. Now it's time for another Yuletide tradition: cleaning up the needles that are falling off your Christmas tree.

Top Japan lab dismisses ground-breaking stem cell study

Dec 26, 2014

Japan's top research institute on Friday hammered the final nail in the coffin of what was once billed as a ground-breaking stem cell study, dismissing it as flawed and saying the work could have been fabricated.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.