King Tut died of blood disorder: German researchers

Jun 23, 2010
King Tutankhamun's golden mask displayed at the Egyptian museum in Cairo in 2009. Legendary pharaoh Tutankhamun was probably killed by the genetic blood disorder sickle cell disease, German scientists said Wednesday, rejecting earlier research that suggested he died of malaria.

Legendary pharaoh Tutankhamun was probably killed by the genetic blood disorder sickle cell disease, German scientists said Wednesday, rejecting earlier research that suggested he died of malaria.

The team at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in the northern city of Hamburg questioned the conclusions of a major Egyptian study released in February on the enigmatic boy-king's early demise.

That examination, involving DNA tests and computerised tomography (CT) scans on Tutankhamun's mummy, said he died of malaria after suffering a fall, putting to rest the theory that he was murdered.

But the German researchers said in a letter published online Wednesday by the that closer scrutiny of his foot bones pointed to sickle cell disease, in which become dangerously misshaped.

"We question the reliability of the genetic data presented in this (the Egyptian) study and therefore the validity of the authors' conclusions," the letter said.

"(The) radiological signs are compatible with osteopathologic lesions seen in sickle cell disease (SCD), a hematological disorder that occurs at gene carrier rates of nine percent to 22 percent in inhabitants of Egyptian oases."

Tutankhamun's death at about 19, after 10 years of rule between 1333 to 1324 BC, has long been a source of speculation.

One of the most common genetic disorders, causes blood cells to take the shape of a crescent instead of being smooth and round, thereby blocking blood flow and leading to chronic pain, infections and tissue death.

The researchers called for further DNA tests on Tutankhamun's mummy for a definitive cause of death.

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User comments : 5

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sven
not rated yet Jun 24, 2010
Apperently the egyptians are very reluctant to reveal his DNA. What has leaked is that his paternal linage is the same as north-european.
frajo
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2010
What has leaked is that his paternal linage is the same as north-european.
What are your sources?
AMMBD
not rated yet Jun 24, 2010
Apperently the egyptians are very reluctant to reveal his DNA. What has leaked is that his paternal linage is the same as north-european.


yes, do please cite your sources.
DecimatedEclipse
not rated yet Jul 02, 2010
http://mathildasa...nalysis/

google search yielded this.
frajo
1 / 5 (1) Jul 02, 2010
Thanks for the link. Mathilda's anthropology blog is a good idea by Dienikes Pontikos who started the Dienekes anthropology blog quite some years earlier.
If you take the time to read some texts on both blogs you'll note the big difference in the levels of professionalism.
Mathilda's introducing remark to her text about Tutankhamun
The news of the month, kindly posted to me by a friend
is definitely not related to hard science, but to hearsay only.

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