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A leap in using silicon for battery anodes

The same material you'll find at the tip of a pencil—graphite—has long been a key component in today's lithium-ion batteries. As our reliance on these batteries increases, however, graphite-based electrodes are due for ...

'Decoy' nanoparticles can block HIV and prevent infection

Flipping the standard viral drug targeting approach on its head, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a promising new "nanosponge" method for preventing HIV from proliferating in the body: coating ...

Research shows the way to more efficient EPO production

To many people, EPO rhymes with doping and cycling. But in fact, EPO is an important medical drug. This hormone works naturally in the body by stimulating red blood cell production. Patients suffering from anemia caused by ...

Double X-ray vision helps tuberculosis and osteoporosis research

With an advanced X-ray combination technique, scientists have traced nanocarriers for tuberculosis drugs within cells with very high precision. The method combines two sophisticated scanning X-ray measurements and can locate ...

New device identifies high-quality blood donors

Blood banks have long known about high-quality donors—individuals whose red blood cells stay viable for longer in storage and in the recipient's body.

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Red blood cell

Red blood cells are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrate body's principal means of delivering oxygen to the body tissues via the blood. They take up oxygen in the lungs or gills and release it while squeezing through the body's capillaries. The cells are filled with hemoglobin, a biomolecule that can bind to oxygen. The blood's red color is due to the color of oxygen-rich hemoglobin. In humans, red blood cells develop in the bone marrow and live for about 120 days; they take the form of flexible biconcave disks that lack a cell nucleus and organelles and they cannot synthesize protein.

Red blood cells are also known as RBCs, red blood corpuscles (an archaic term), haematids or erythrocytes (from Greek erythros for "red" and kytos for "hollow", with cyte translated as "cell" in modern usage). The capitalized term Red Blood Cells is the proper name in the US for erythrocytes in storage solution used in transfusion medicine.

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